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Increased depression and metabolic risk in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors

Overview of attention for article published in Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, July 2016
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Increased depression and metabolic risk in postmenopausal breast cancer survivors
Published in
Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13098-016-0170-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Monica C. Serra, Andrew P. Goldberg, Alice S. Ryan

Abstract

Breast cancer survivors (BCS) are at high risk for the development of obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and metabolic syndrome. There is increasing interest in the association between depression and metabolic dysfunction, which is relevant in this population as depression is often present in the chronic phase of cancer recovery. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate metabolic risk in BCS with and without depression compared to non-cancer controls. African American (46 %) and Caucasian (54 %) postmenopausal BCS (N = 28; age: 60 ± 2 years; mean ± SEM) were matched for race, age (±2 years), and BMI (±2 kg/m(2)) to non-cancer controls (N = 28). Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) >16 or antidepressant medication usage was used to classify depression. Metabolic status was defined by 2-hr glucose during an OGTT and classification of metabolic syndrome. Compared to non-cancer controls, BCS had similar 2-hr glucose, but higher fasting glucose and total cholesterol, and were 2.5 times more likely to have metabolic syndrome (21 vs. 52 %)(P's < 0.05). Conversely, HDL-C was 16 % higher in BCS (P < 0.05). Forty three % of BCS were on antidepressants compared to 14 % in non-cancer controls, despite similar mean CES-D scores (6 ± 1). Depressed BCS (46 %) had a higher BMI, waist circumference, fasting glucose, and more metabolic syndrome components than non-depressed BCS (P's < 0.05). BCS have a heightened prevalence of depression that may be associated with an increased prevalence of metabolic syndrome. These results support the need to monitor weight gain, depression, and the progression of metabolic abnormalities after cancer diagnosis and treatment. Further studies into the mechanistic link between depression and metabolic disease are necessary to identify strategies that can offset their impact on obesity and associated cardiovascular risk following a breast cancer diagnosis.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 10 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Researcher 4 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 10 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 13 29%
Psychology 5 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 13 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,511,371
of 8,150,076 outputs
Outputs from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#106
of 290 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#104,321
of 258,072 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Diabetology & Metabolic Syndrome
#5
of 10 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,150,076 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 290 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,072 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 10 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.