↓ Skip to main content

Assessing cross-resistance within the pyrethroids in terms of their interactions with key cytochrome P450 enzymes and resistance in vector populations

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, February 2021
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
18 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
6 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
30 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Assessing cross-resistance within the pyrethroids in terms of their interactions with key cytochrome P450 enzymes and resistance in vector populations
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, February 2021
DOI 10.1186/s13071-021-04609-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

C. L. Moyes, R. S. Lees, C. Yunta, K. J. Walker, K. Hemmings, F. Oladepo, P. A. Hancock, D. Weetman, M. J. I. Paine, H. M. Ismail

Abstract

It is important to understand whether the potential impact of pyrethroid resistance on malaria control can be mitigated by switching between different pyrethroids or whether cross-resistance within this insecticide class precludes this approach. Here we assess the relationships among pyrethroids in terms of their binding affinity to, and depletion by, key cytochrome P450 enzymes (hereafter P450s) that are known to confer metabolic pyrethroid resistance in Anopheles gambiae (s.l.) and An. funestus, in order to identify which pyrethroids may diverge from the others in their vulnerability to resistance. We then investigate whether these same pyrethroids also diverge from the others in terms of resistance in vector populations. We found that the type I and II pyrethroids permethrin and deltamethrin, respectively, are closely related in terms of binding affinity to key P450s, depletion by P450s and resistance within vector populations. Bifenthrin, which lacks the common structural moiety of most pyrethroids, diverged from the other pyrethroids tested in terms of both binding affinity to key P450s and depletion by P450s, but resistance to bifenthrin has rarely been tested in vector populations and was not analysed here. Etofenprox, which also lacks the common structural moiety of most pyrethroids, diverged from the more commonly deployed pyrethroids in terms of binding affinity to key P450s and resistance in vector populations, but did not diverge from these pyrethroids in terms of depletion by the P450s. The analysis of depletion by the P450s indicated that etofenprox may be more vulnerable to metabolic resistance mechanisms in vector populations. In addition, greater resistance to etofenprox was found across Aedes aegypti populations, but greater resistance to this compound was not found in any of the malaria vector species analysed. The results for pyrethroid depletion by anopheline P450s in the laboratory were largely not repeated in the findings for resistance in malaria vector populations. Importantly, the prevalence of resistance to the pyrethroids α-cypermethrin, cyfluthrin, deltamethrin, λ-cyhalothrin and permethrin was correlated across malaria vector populations, and switching between these compounds as a tool to mitigate against pyrethroid resistance is not advised without strong evidence supporting a true difference in resistance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 18 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 10%
Lecturer 2 7%
Researcher 2 7%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 4 13%
Unknown 13 43%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 7%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 15 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 March 2021.
All research outputs
#2,109,248
of 20,396,616 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#408
of 5,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#52,110
of 309,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,396,616 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 89th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 309,913 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them