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Internet-based modular program BADI for adjustment disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Psychiatry, July 2016
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Title
Internet-based modular program BADI for adjustment disorder: protocol of a randomized controlled trial
Published in
BMC Psychiatry, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12888-016-0980-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paulius Skruibis, Jonas Eimontas, Migle Dovydaitiene, Egle Mazulyte, Paulina Zelviene, Evaldas Kazlauskas

Abstract

Adjustment disorder is one of the most common mental health diagnoses. Still it receives relatively little attention from researchers trying to establish best interventions to treat it. With high prevalence of stressful life events, which might be leading to adjustment disorder, and limited resources of mental health service providers, online interventions could be a very practical way of helping people who have these disorders or are in the risk to develop them. The proposed study protocol is aimed to describe a randomized controlled trial of an internet-based modular intervention for adjustment disorder as it is defined in a proposal for the ICD-11. This study is a two-armed Randomized Controlled Trial (RCT) to examine the effectiveness of a web-based intervention BADI (Brief Adjustment Disorder Intervention) for adjustment disorder symptoms. BADI has four modules: Relaxation, Time management, Mindfulness and Strengthening relationships. It is based on stress and coping research and integrates evidence-based treatment approaches such as Cognitive Behavioural therapy (CBT), mindfulness and body-mind practices, as well as exercises for enhancing social support. Primary outcome of the study are symptoms of adjustment disorder and well-being. Engagement into the program and motivation for change is a secondary outcome. All participants after completing the baseline assessment are randomly assigned to one of the two groups: either to the one in which participant will instantly gain access to the BADI intervention or a group in which participants will be given access to the BADI program after waiting one month. Participants of BADI can choose exercises of the program flexibly. There is no particular order in which the exercises should be completed. Study will provide new insights of modular internet-based interventions efficacy for adjustment disorders. The study will also provide information about the role of motivation and expectancies on engagement in modular internet-based interventions. In case this RCT supports effectiveness of fully automated version of BADI, it could be used very broadly. It could become a cost-effective and accessible intervention for adjustment disorder. The study was retrospectively registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry with the registration number ACTRN12616000883415 . Registered 5 July, 2016.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 210 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 <1%
Unknown 209 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 36 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 31 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 25 12%
Researcher 23 11%
Student > Bachelor 23 11%
Other 24 11%
Unknown 48 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 83 40%
Medicine and Dentistry 21 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 16 8%
Social Sciences 6 3%
Neuroscience 6 3%
Other 27 13%
Unknown 51 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 August 2017.
All research outputs
#12,877,470
of 14,574,779 outputs
Outputs from BMC Psychiatry
#2,901
of 3,266 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#222,006
of 264,147 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Psychiatry
#1
of 2 outputs
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