↓ Skip to main content

The insect-specific Palm Creek virus modulates West Nile virus infection in and transmission by Australian mosquitoes

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, July 2016
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (76th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
85 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
110 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
The insect-specific Palm Creek virus modulates West Nile virus infection in and transmission by Australian mosquitoes
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13071-016-1683-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sonja Hall-Mendelin, Breeanna J. McLean, Helle Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Jody Hobson-Peters, Roy A. Hall, Andrew F. van den Hurk

Abstract

Insect-specific viruses do not replicate in vertebrate cells, but persist in mosquito populations and are highly prevalent in nature. These viruses may naturally regulate the transmission of pathogenic vertebrate-infecting arboviruses in co-infected mosquitoes. Following the isolation of the first Australian insect-specific flavivirus (ISF), Palm Creek virus (PCV), we investigated routes of infection and transmission of this virus in key Australian arbovirus vectors and its impact on replication and transmission of West Nile virus (WNV). Culex annulirostris, Aedes aegypti and Aedes vigilax were exposed to PCV, and infection, replication and transmission rates in individual mosquitoes determined. To test whether the virus could be transmitted vertically, progeny reared from eggs oviposited by PCV-inoculated Cx. annulirostris were analysed for the presence of PCV. To assess whether prior infection of mosquitoes with PCV could also suppress the transmission of pathogenic flaviviruses, PCV positive or negative Cx. annulirostris were subsequently exposed to WNV. No PCV-infected Cx. annulirostris were detected 16 days after feeding on an infectious blood meal. However, when intrathoracically inoculated with PCV, Cx. annulirostris infection rates were 100 %. Similar rates of infection were observed in Ae. aegypti (100 %) and Ae. vigilax (95 %). Notably, PCV was not detected in any saliva expectorates collected from any of these species. PCV was not detected in 1038 progeny reared from 59 PCV-infected Cx. annulirostris. After feeding on a blood meal containing 10(7) infectious units of WNV, significantly fewer PCV-infected Cx. annulirostris were infected or transmitted WNV compared to PCV negative mosquitoes. Immunohistochemistry revealed that PCV localized in the midgut epithelial cells, which are the first site of infection with WNV. Our results indicate that PCV cannot infect Cx. annulirostris via the oral route, nor be transmitted in saliva or vertically to progeny. We also provide further evidence that prior infection with insect-specific viruses can regulate the infection and transmission of pathogenic arboviruses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 110 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 108 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 23 21%
Student > Master 22 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 17 15%
Student > Bachelor 14 13%
Other 5 5%
Other 11 10%
Unknown 18 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 37 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 25 23%
Immunology and Microbiology 11 10%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 5%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 4 4%
Other 9 8%
Unknown 19 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 July 2020.
All research outputs
#3,060,535
of 15,780,173 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#694
of 4,225 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#63,641
of 266,453 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,780,173 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 80th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,225 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,453 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them