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Working at the nexus between public health policy, practice and research. Dynamics of knowledge sharing in the Netherlands

Overview of attention for article published in Health Research Policy and Systems, October 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
17 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
27 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
129 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
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Title
Working at the nexus between public health policy, practice and research. Dynamics of knowledge sharing in the Netherlands
Published in
Health Research Policy and Systems, October 2012
DOI 10.1186/1478-4505-10-33
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria W Jansen, Evelyne De Leeuw, Marjan Hoeijmakers, Nanne K De Vries

Abstract

Joining the domains of practice, research and policy is an important aspect of boosting the quality performance required to tackle complex public health problems. "Joining domains" implies a departure from the linear and technocratic knowledge-translation approach. Integrating the practice, research and policy triangle means knowing its elements, appreciating the barriers, identifying possible cooperation strategies and studying strategy effectiveness under specified conditions.This article examines the dynamic process of developing an Academic Collaborative Centre for Public Health in the Netherlands, with the objective of achieving that the three domains of policy, practice and research become working partners on an equal footing. An interpretative hermeneutic approach was used to interpret the phenomenon of collaboration at the nexus between the three domains. The project was explicitly grounded in current organizational culture and routines, applied to nexus action. In the process of examination, we used both quantitative (e.g. records) and qualitative data (e.g., interviews and observations). The data were interpreted using the Actor-Network, Institutional Re-Design and Blurring the Boundaries theories. Results show commitment at strategic level. At the tactical level, however, managers were inclined to prioritize daily routine, while the policy domain remained absent. At the operational level, practitioners learned to do PhD research in real-life practice and researchers became acquainted with problems of practice and policy, resulting in new research initiatives. We conclude that working at the nexus is an ongoing process of formation and reformation. Strategies based on Institutional Re-Design theories in particular might help to more actively stimulate managers' involvement to establish mutually supportive networks.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 17 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 126 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 27 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 19%
Student > Master 24 19%
Other 10 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 5%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 15 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 28 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 20 16%
Psychology 20 16%
Business, Management and Accounting 11 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 5%
Other 26 20%
Unknown 17 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 11. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 December 2014.
All research outputs
#1,104,712
of 11,344,026 outputs
Outputs from Health Research Policy and Systems
#179
of 569 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,827
of 118,747 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health Research Policy and Systems
#3
of 8 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,344,026 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 569 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 118,747 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 8 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 5 of them.