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The concurrence of musculoskeletal pain and associated work-related factors: a cross sectional study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, July 2016
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1 tweeter

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30 Dimensions

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147 Mendeley
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Title
The concurrence of musculoskeletal pain and associated work-related factors: a cross sectional study
Published in
BMC Public Health, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3306-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rita de Cássia Pereira Fernandes, Silvana Maria da Silva Pataro, Roberta Brasileiro de Carvalho, Alex Burdorf

Abstract

Several recent studies have described the presence of musculoskeletal complaints, presenting evidence that multisite musculoskeletal pain (MP) is more often present than single-site musculoskeletal pain. However, less is known about determinants of this multimorbidity, particularly, concerning the role of occupational factors and, mainly, what determines single or multisite pain. This study described the associations between pain in different body sites and investigated related factors to MP in workers from Brazil. A total of 1070 workers (228 women and 842 men), from urban cleaning services and from shoe manufacturers, participated in this cross sectional study (response 97 %). Interviewer-administered questionnaire included sociodemographic factors, physical and psychosocial work demands, leisure-time activities and musculoskeletal pain which was presence of pain in previous seven days, considering eight body sites and MP, the sum score of all painful sites, varying 0-8. A factor analysis was performed that captured the nine variables of physical exposure into two latent factors. Associations of pain between different body sites were assessed. Cox regression analyses, presenting the prevalence ratio (PR), showed the related factors to MP. In the previous seven days, 30 % of workers had MP. For all body sites, comorbidity ranged from 72 % to 91 %. Having pain in one body site is associated with pain in other site and the associations between proximal sites were stronger than between more distal sites. High exposure to manual material handling and awkward postures (PR = 1.5, 95 % CI 1.1-2.0), job strain (PR = 1.2, 95 % CI 1.0-1.6), and low social support (PR = 1.3, 95 % CI 1.0-1.7) and being woman (PR = 1.7, 95 % CI 1.3-2.3) were associated with MP. Risk factors for single-site pain and for subsequent musculoskeletal comorbidity were very similar, suggesting an additive effect of risk factors. Most workers reported MP that was associated with several work-related factors. The findings support the idea that multisite pain is a continuum of single-site pain, maintained by exposure to several risk factors, rather than the result of a specific risk factor that initiates the multisite pain but not single-site pain. Workplace interventions are needed to decrease the number of pain sites, in order to improve the worker's health.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 147 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 147 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 26 18%
Student > Bachelor 19 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 8%
Researcher 7 5%
Other 25 17%
Unknown 43 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 29 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 15%
Psychology 12 8%
Engineering 11 7%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Other 16 11%
Unknown 51 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,324,062
of 8,148,366 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,108
of 6,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#141,624
of 257,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#257
of 335 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,148,366 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,926 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 257,952 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 335 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.