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Characterization of VP1 sequence of Coxsackievirus A16 isolates by Bayesian evolutionary method

Overview of attention for article published in Virology Journal, July 2016
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Title
Characterization of VP1 sequence of Coxsackievirus A16 isolates by Bayesian evolutionary method
Published in
Virology Journal, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12985-016-0578-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Guolian Zhao, Xun Zhang, Changmin Wang, Guoqing Wang, Fan Li

Abstract

Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16), a major etiopathologic cause of pediatric hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) worldwide, has been reported to have caused several fatalities. Revealing the evolutionary and epidemiologic dynamics of CV-A16 across time and space is central to understanding its outbreak potential. In this study, we isolated six CV-A16 strains in China's Jilin province and construct a maximum clade credibility (MCC) tree for CV-A16 VP1 gene by the Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo method using 708 strains from GenBank with epidemiological information. The evolution characteristics of CV-A16 VP1 gene was also analysed dynamicly through Bayesian skyline plot. All CV-A16 strains identified could be classified into five major genogroups, denoted by GI-GV. GIV and GV have co-circulated in China since 2007, and the CV-A16 epidemic strain isolated in the Jilin province, China, can be classified as GIV-3. The CV-A16 genogroups circulating recently in China have the same ancestor since 2007. The genetic diversity of the CV-A16 VP1 gene shows a continuous increase since the mid-1990s, with sharp increases in genetic diversity in 1997 and 2007 and reached peak in 2007. Very low genetic diversity existed after 2010. The CV-A16 VP1 gene evolutionary rate was 6.656E-3 substitutions per site per year. We predicted the dynamic phylogenetic trends, which indicate outbreak trends of CV-A16, and provide theoretical foundations for clinical prevention and treatment of HFMD which caused by a CV-A16.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 16 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 16 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 25%
Student > Master 2 13%
Student > Bachelor 2 13%
Unspecified 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 4 25%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 19%
Computer Science 2 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 6%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 6%
Other 2 13%
Unknown 5 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2016.
All research outputs
#6,193,558
of 8,148,366 outputs
Outputs from Virology Journal
#1,294
of 1,655 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#182,788
of 257,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Virology Journal
#41
of 50 outputs
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