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Quality of life and related factors of nursing home residents in Singapore

Overview of attention for article published in Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, July 2016
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Title
Quality of life and related factors of nursing home residents in Singapore
Published in
Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12955-016-0503-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Pei Wang, Philip Yap, Gerald Koh, Jia An Chong, Lucy Jennifer Davies, Mayank Dalakoti, Ngan Phoon Fong, Wei Wei Tiong, Nan Luo

Abstract

Litter is known about the well-being of nursing home (NH) residents in Singapore. This study aimed to identify predictors of self-reported quality of life (QOL) of NH residents in Singapore. In face-to-face interviews, trained medical students assessed each consenting resident recruited from 6 local NHs using a modified Minnesota QOL questionnaire, and rating scales and questions assessing independence, cognitive function, depression, and communication. Predictors of residents' QOL in five aspects (comfort, dignity, food enjoyment, autonomy, and security) were identified using the censored least absolute deviations (CLAD) models. A total of 375 residents completed the interviews. A higher score on comfort was negatively associated with major depression while a higher score on dignity was positively associated with no difficulty in communication with staff. Higher scores in food enjoyment were negatively associated with major depression and poorer cognitive function. Higher scores in autonomy were negatively associated with major depression, greater dependence, and difficulty in communication with staff. A higher score on security were negatively associated with major depression. It appears that depression and difficulty in communication with staff are the two main modifiable risk factors of poor quality of life of local NH residents.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 123 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 123 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 22 18%
Student > Bachelor 18 15%
Researcher 9 7%
Student > Postgraduate 7 6%
Lecturer 7 6%
Other 22 18%
Unknown 38 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 33 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 16 13%
Psychology 10 8%
Social Sciences 9 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 41 33%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 28 July 2016.
All research outputs
#12,269,460
of 15,442,255 outputs
Outputs from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#1,156
of 1,660 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#188,620
of 266,186 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Health and Quality of Life Outcomes
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,442,255 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,660 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.0. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 266,186 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them