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Maternal obesity and postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal and caesarean delivery among nulliparous women at term: a retrospective cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)

Mentioned by

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3 tweeters

Citations

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52 Dimensions

Readers on

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144 Mendeley
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Title
Maternal obesity and postpartum haemorrhage after vaginal and caesarean delivery among nulliparous women at term: a retrospective cohort study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, October 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2393-12-112
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elaine M Fyfe, John MD Thompson, Ngaire H Anderson, Katie M Groom, Lesley M McCowan

Abstract

Increasing rates of postpartum haemorrhage in developed countries over the past two decades are not explained by corresponding changes in risk factors and conjecture has been raised that maternal obesity may be responsible. Few studies investigating risk factors for PPH have included BMI or investigated PPH risk among nulliparous women. The aim of this study was to determine in a cohort of nulliparous women delivering at term whether overweight and obesity are independent risk factors for major postpartum haemorrhage (PPH ≥1000ml) after vaginal and caesarean section delivery. The study population was nulliparous singleton pregnancies delivered at term at National Women's Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand from 2006 to 2009 (N=11,363). Multivariable logistic regression was adjusted for risk factors for major PPH. There were 7238 (63.7%) women of normal BMI, 2631 (23.2%) overweight and 1494 (13.1%) obese. Overall, PPH rates were increased in overweight and obese compared with normal-weight women (n=255 [9.7%], n=233 [15.6%]), n=524 [7.2%], p <.001) respectively. There was an approximate twofold increase in risk in obese nulliparous women that was independent of confounders, adjusted odds ratio [aOR (95% CI)] for all deliveries 1.86 (1.51-2.28). Being obese was a risk factor for major PPH following both caesarean 1.73 (1.32-2.28) and vaginal delivery 2.11 (1.54-2.89) and the latter risk was similar after exclusion of women with major perineal trauma and retained placentae. Three additional factors were consistently associated with risk for major PPH regardless of mode of delivery: increasing infant birthweight, antepartum haemorrhage and Asian ethnicity. Nulliparous obese women have a twofold increase in risk of major PPH compared to women with normal BMI regardless of mode of delivery. Higher rates of PPH among obese women are not attributable to their higher rates of caesarean delivery. Obesity is an important high risk factor for PPH, and the risk following vaginal delivery is emphasised. We recommend in addition to standard practice of active management of third stage of labour, there should be increased vigilance and preparation for PPH management in obese women.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 144 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 1%
Canada 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 140 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 30 21%
Student > Master 28 19%
Student > Postgraduate 14 10%
Researcher 14 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 7%
Other 28 19%
Unknown 20 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 70 49%
Nursing and Health Professions 20 14%
Social Sciences 6 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 3%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 3%
Other 15 10%
Unknown 23 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 October 2012.
All research outputs
#1,955,948
of 4,504,945 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#673
of 1,124 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,985
of 81,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#29
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 4,504,945 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 55th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,124 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 81,956 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 28th percentile – i.e., 28% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.