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Should the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae be of wider concern for veterinary and medical science?

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, March 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
1 tweeter
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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78 Dimensions

Readers on

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82 Mendeley
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Title
Should the poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae be of wider concern for veterinary and medical science?
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, March 2015
DOI 10.1186/s13071-015-0768-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

David R George, Robert D Finn, Kirsty M Graham, Monique F Mul, Veronika Maurer, Claire Valiente Moro, Olivier AE Sparagano

Abstract

The poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae is best known as a threat to the laying-hen industry; adversely affecting production and hen health and welfare throughout the globe, both directly and through its role as a disease vector. Nevertheless, D. gallinae is being increasingly implemented in dermatological complaints in non-avian hosts, suggesting that its significance may extend beyond poultry. The main objective of the current work was to review the potential of D. gallinae as a wider veterinary and medical threat. Results demonstrated that, as an avian mite, D. gallinae is unsurprisingly an occasional pest of pet birds. However, research also supports that these mites will feed from a range of other animals including: cats, dogs, rodents, rabbits, horses and man. We conclude that although reported cases of D. gallinae infesting mammals are relatively rare, when coupled with the reported genetic plasticity of this species and evidence of permanent infestations on non-avian hosts, potential for host-expansion may exist. The impact of, and mechanisms and risk factors for such expansion are discussed, and suggestions for further work made. Given the potential severity of any level of host-expansion in D. gallinae, we conclude that further research should be urgently conducted to confirm the full extent of the threat posed by D. gallinae to (non-avian) veterinary and medical sectors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 82 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 1%
Unknown 81 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 16 20%
Researcher 10 12%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 11%
Student > Master 7 9%
Other 6 7%
Other 13 16%
Unknown 21 26%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 18 22%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 16 20%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 10%
Environmental Science 6 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 5%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 24 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 February 2021.
All research outputs
#3,042,195
of 17,361,274 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#669
of 4,555 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#57,240
of 270,627 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,361,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,555 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,627 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them