↓ Skip to main content

Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neurology, June 2011
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
29 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
331 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Effects of aerobic exercise therapy and cognitive behavioural therapy on functioning and quality of life in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: protocol of the FACTS-2-ALS trial
Published in
BMC Neurology, June 2011
DOI 10.1186/1471-2377-11-70
Pubmed ID
Authors

Annerieke C van Groenestijn, Ingrid GL van de Port, Carin D Schröder, Marcel WM Post, Hepke F Grupstra, Esther T Kruitwagen, Harmen van der Linde, Reinout O van Vliet, Margreet GH van de Weerd, Leonard H van den Berg, Eline Lindeman

Abstract

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting motor neurons in the spinal cord, brainstem and motor cortex, leading to muscle weakness. Muscle weakness may result in the avoidance of physical activity, which exacerbates disuse weakness and cardiovascular deconditioning. The impact of the grave prognosis may result in depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Since there is no cure for ALS, optimal treatment is based on symptom management and preservation of quality of life (QoL), provided in a multidisciplinary setting. Two distinctly different therapeutic interventions may be effective to improve or preserve daily functioning and QoL at the highest achievable level: aerobic exercise therapy (AET) to maintain or enhance functional capacity and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) to improve coping style and cognitions in patients with ALS. However, evidence to support either approach is still insufficient, and the underlying mechanisms of the approaches remain poorly understood. The primary aim of the FACTS-2-ALS trial is to study the effects of AET and CBT, in addition to usual care, compared to usual care alone, on functioning and QoL in patients with ALS.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 331 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Unknown 324 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 59 18%
Student > Bachelor 59 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 35 11%
Researcher 27 8%
Unspecified 16 5%
Other 59 18%
Unknown 76 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 67 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 48 15%
Psychology 41 12%
Sports and Recreations 26 8%
Unspecified 16 5%
Other 49 15%
Unknown 84 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2014.
All research outputs
#12,572,280
of 22,684,168 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neurology
#914
of 2,418 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#75,216
of 113,619 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neurology
#13
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,684,168 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 44th percentile – i.e., 44% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,418 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 113,619 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.