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Testing patient targeted therapies in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder with the arthrokinetic reflex: individual patient research

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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6 Dimensions

Readers on

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35 Mendeley
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Title
Testing patient targeted therapies in patients with temporomandibular joint disorder with the arthrokinetic reflex: individual patient research
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-0991-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Garabed G. Demerjian, Andre Barkhordarian, Francesco Chiappelli

Abstract

Traditional research in the health sciences has involved control and experimental groups of patients, and descriptive and inferential statistical analyses performed on the measurements obtained from the samples in each group. As the novel model of translational healthcare, which integrates translational research and translational effectiveness, becomes increasingly established in modern contemporary medicine, healthcare continues to evolve into a model of care that is evidence-based, effectiveness-focused and patient-centered. Patient-centered care and patient-targeted therapies require the timely and critical development and validation of a new research paradigm, individual patient research (IPR), as opposed to the customary group research approach. Here, we propose a model of individual patient research to define and characterize the effectiveness of a novel therapeutic intervention for temporomandibular joint disorder. The intervention must be tailor-made for each individual patient, and the data from each patient must be analyzed individually. We propose that this endeavor is best achieved by means of an adaptive cluster randomized stepped wedge blinded controlled trial, because it permit individual patient outcomes research and analysis, ensures equipoise, and maintains adequate power. The patient targeted therapies section of the Journal of Translational Medicine must endeavor to facilitate the dissemination of studies that focus broadly on translational research for the ultimate benefit of individual patients.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 11%
Other 2 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 6%
Student > Bachelor 2 6%
Other 7 20%
Unknown 11 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 20%
Social Sciences 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Psychology 2 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 3%
Other 6 17%
Unknown 14 40%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 May 2018.
All research outputs
#9,867,834
of 12,889,535 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2,217
of 2,548 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#170,139
of 263,435 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,889,535 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,548 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one is in the 10th percentile – i.e., 10% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 263,435 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.