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Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes

Overview of attention for article published in Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (92nd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
patent
2 patents
wikipedia
19 Wikipedia pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
214 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
193 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes
Published in
Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases, May 2007
DOI 10.1186/1750-1172-2-22
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jérôme Honnorat, Jean-Christophe Antoine

Abstract

Paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS) can be defined as remote effects of cancer that are not caused by the tumor and its metastasis, or by infection, ischemia or metabolic disruptions. PNS are rare, affecting less than 1/10,000 patients with cancer. Only the Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome is relatively frequent, occurring in about 1% of patients with small cell lung cancer. PNS can affect any part of the central and peripheral nervous system, the neuromuscular junction, and muscle. They can be isolated or occur in association. In most patients, the neurological disorder develops before the cancer becomes clinically overt and the patient is referred to the neurologist who has the charge of identifying a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic. PNS are usually severely disabling. The most common PNS are Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS), subacute cerebellar ataxia, limbic encephalitis (LE), opsoclonus-myoclonus (OM), retinopathies (cancer-associated retinopathy (CAR) and melanoma-associated retinopathy (MAR), Stiff-Person syndrome (SPS), chronic gastrointestinal pseudoobstruction (CGP), sensory neuronopathy (SSN), encephalomyelitis (EM) and dermatomyositis. PNS are caused by autoimmune processes triggered by the cancer and directed against antigens common to both the cancer and the nervous system, designated as onconeural antigens. Due to their high specificity (> 90%), the best way to diagnose a neurological disorder as paraneoplastic is to identify one of the well-characterized anti-onconeural protein antibodies in the patient's serum. In addition, as these antibodies are associated with a restricted range of cancers, they can guide the search for the underlying tumor at a stage when it is frequently not clinically overt. This is a critical point as, to date, the best way to stabilize PNS is to treat the cancer as soon as possible. Unfortunately, about one-third of patients do not have detectable antibodies and 5% to 10% have an atypical antibody that is not well-characterized. As PNS are believed to be immune-mediated, suppression of the immune response represents another treatment approach.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 193 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 4 2%
Austria 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 181 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 27 14%
Researcher 26 13%
Other 24 12%
Student > Postgraduate 21 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 19 10%
Other 44 23%
Unknown 32 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 107 55%
Neuroscience 15 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 4%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 2%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 3 2%
Other 18 9%
Unknown 38 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2019.
All research outputs
#1,935,345
of 17,351,915 outputs
Outputs from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#227
of 1,839 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#16,612
of 160,650 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
#3
of 26 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,351,915 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,839 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 160,650 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 26 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.