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Effect of short-term exposure to particulate air pollution on heart rate variability in normal-weight and obese adults

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Health, March 2021
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  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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5 tweeters

Readers on

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17 Mendeley
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Title
Effect of short-term exposure to particulate air pollution on heart rate variability in normal-weight and obese adults
Published in
Environmental Health, March 2021
DOI 10.1186/s12940-021-00707-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Luyi Li, Dayu Hu, Wenlou Zhang, Liyan Cui, Xu Jia, Di Yang, Shan Liu, Furong Deng, Junxiu Liu, Xinbiao Guo

Abstract

The adverse effects of particulate air pollution on heart rate variability (HRV) have been reported. However, it remains unclear whether they differ by the weight status as well as between wake and sleep. A repeated-measure study was conducted in 97 young adults in Beijing, China, and they were classified by body mass index (BMI) as normal-weight (BMI, 18.5-24.0 kg/m2) and obese (BMI ≥ 28.0 kg/m2) groups. Personal exposures to fine particulate matter (PM2.5) and black carbon (BC) were measured with portable exposure monitors, and the ambient PM2.5/BC concentrations were obtained from the fixed monitoring sites near the subjects' residences. HRV and heart rate (HR) were monitored by 24-h Holter electrocardiography. The study period was divided into waking and sleeping hours according to time-activity diaries. Linear mixed-effects models were used to investigate the effects of PM2.5/BC on HRV and HR in both groups during wake and sleep. The effects of short-term exposure to PM2.5/BC on HRV were more pronounced among obese participants. In the normal-weight group, the positive association between personal PM2.5/BC exposure and high-frequency power (HF) as well as the ratio of low-frequency power to high-frequency power (LF/HF) was observed during wakefulness. In the obese group, personal PM2.5/BC exposure was negatively associated with HF but positively associated with LF/HF during wakefulness, whereas it was negatively correlated to total power and standard deviation of all NN intervals (SDNN) during sleep. An interquartile range (IQR) increase in BC at 2-h moving average was associated with 37.64% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 25.03, 51.51%) increases in LF/HF during wakefulness and associated with 6.28% (95% CI: - 17.26, 6.15%) decreases in SDNN during sleep in obese individuals, and the interaction terms between BC and obesity in LF/HF and SDNN were both statistically significant (p <  0.05). The results also suggested that the effects of PM2.5/BC exposure on several HRV indices and HR differed in magnitude or direction between wake and sleep. Short-term exposure to PM2.5/BC is associated with HRV and HR, especially in obese individuals. The circadian rhythm of HRV should be considered in future studies when HRV is applied.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 17 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 17 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 24%
Student > Bachelor 3 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 12%
Other 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 5 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 35%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 12%
Chemistry 2 12%
Psychology 1 6%
Neuroscience 1 6%
Other 1 6%
Unknown 4 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 September 2021.
All research outputs
#10,308,417
of 19,003,560 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Health
#848
of 1,371 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#137,192
of 321,724 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Health
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,003,560 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,371 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.7. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 321,724 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them