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Development of sedentary behavior across childhood and adolescence: longitudinal analysis of the Gateshead Millennium Study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

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35 tweeters
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1 Facebook page

Citations

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53 Dimensions

Readers on

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133 Mendeley
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Title
Development of sedentary behavior across childhood and adolescence: longitudinal analysis of the Gateshead Millennium Study
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12966-016-0413-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Xanne Janssen, Kay D. Mann, Laura Basterfield, Kathryn N. Parkinson, Mark S. Pearce, Jessica K. Reilly, Ashley J. Adamson, John J. Reilly, Janssen, Xanne, Mann, Kay D, Basterfield, Laura, Parkinson, Kathryn N, Pearce, Mark S, Reilly, Jessica K, Adamson, Ashley J, Reilly, John J

Abstract

In many parts of the world policy and research interventions to modify sedentary behavior of children and adolescents are now being developed. However, the evidence to inform these interventions (e.g. how sedentary behavior changes across childhood and adolescence) is limited. This study aimed to assess longitudinal changes in sedentary behavior, and examine the degree of tracking of sedentary behavior from age 7y to 15y. Participants were part of the Gateshead Millennium Study cohort. Measures were made at age 7y (n = 507), 9y (n = 510), 12y (n = 425) and 15y (n = 310). Participants were asked to wear an ActiGraph GT1M and accelerometer epochs were defined as sedentary when recorded counts were ≤25 counts/15 s. Differences in sedentary time and sedentary fragmentation were examined using the Friedman test. Tracking was examined using Spearman's correlation coefficients and trajectories over time were assessed using multilevel linear spline modelling. Median daily sedentary time increased from 51.3 % of waking hours at 7y to 74.2 % at 15y. Sedentary fragmentation decreased from 7y to 15y. The median number of breaks/hour decreased from 8.6 to 4.1 breaks/hour and the median bout duration at 50 % of the cumulative sedentary time increased from 2.4 min to 6.4 min from 7y to 15y. Tracking of sedentary time and sedentary fragmentation was moderate from 7y to 15y however, the rate of change differed with the steepest increases/decreases seen between 9y and 12y. In this study, sedentary time was high and increased to almost 75 % of waking hours at 15y. Sedentary behavior became substantially less fragmented as children grew older. The largest changes in sedentary time and sedentary fragmentation occurred between 9y to 12y, a period which spans the transition to secondary school. These results can be used to inform future interventions aiming to change sedentary behavior.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 35 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 133 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 132 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 23 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 19 14%
Student > Bachelor 15 11%
Researcher 14 11%
Unspecified 11 8%
Other 28 21%
Unknown 23 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 24 18%
Nursing and Health Professions 14 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 13 10%
Unspecified 11 8%
Psychology 11 8%
Other 28 21%
Unknown 32 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 June 2017.
All research outputs
#1,099,923
of 18,212,054 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#485
of 1,704 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,894
of 272,913 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#5
of 13 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,212,054 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,704 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 25.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,913 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.