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Why is malaria associated with poverty? Findings from a cohort study in rural Uganda

Overview of attention for article published in Infectious Diseases of Poverty, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (95th percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
21 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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41 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
191 Mendeley
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Title
Why is malaria associated with poverty? Findings from a cohort study in rural Uganda
Published in
Infectious Diseases of Poverty, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40249-016-0164-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucy S. Tusting, John Rek, Emmanuel Arinaitwe, Sarah G. Staedke, Moses R. Kamya, Jorge Cano, Christian Bottomley, Deborah Johnston, Grant Dorsey, Steve W. Lindsay, Jo Lines

Abstract

Malaria control and sustainable development are linked, but implementation of 'multisectoral' intervention is restricted by a limited understanding of the causal pathways between poverty and malaria. We investigated the relationships between socioeconomic position (SEP), potential determinants of SEP, and malaria in Nagongera, rural Uganda. Socioeconomic information was collected for 318 children aged six months to 10 years living in 100 households, who were followed for up to 36 months. Mosquito density was recorded using monthly light trap collections. Parasite prevalence was measured routinely every three months and malaria incidence determined by passive case detection. First, we evaluated the association between success in smallholder agriculture (the primary livelihood source) and SEP. Second, we explored socioeconomic risk factors for human biting rate (HBR), parasite prevalence and incidence of clinical malaria, and spatial clustering of socioeconomic variables. Third, we investigated the role of selected factors in mediating the association between SEP and malaria. Relative agricultural success was associated with higher SEP. In turn, high SEP was associated with lower HBR (highest versus lowest wealth index tertile: Incidence Rate Ratio 0.71, 95 % confidence intervals (CI) 0.54-0.93, P = 0.01) and lower odds of malaria infection in children (highest versus lowest wealth index tertile: adjusted Odds Ratio 0.52, 95 % CI 0.35-0.78, P = 0.001), but SEP was not associated with clinical malaria incidence. Mediation analysis suggested that part of the total effect of SEP on malaria infection risk was explained by house type (24.9 %, 95 % CI 15.8-58.6 %) and food security (18.6 %, 95 % CI 11.6-48.3 %); however, the assumptions of the mediation analysis may not have been fully met. Housing improvements and agricultural development interventions to reduce poverty merit further investigation as multisectoral interventions against malaria. Further interdisplinary research is needed to understand fully the complex pathways between poverty and malaria and to develop strategies for sustainable malaria control.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 191 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Colombia 1 <1%
Unknown 190 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 35 18%
Student > Ph. D. Student 27 14%
Researcher 24 13%
Student > Bachelor 19 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 6%
Other 31 16%
Unknown 43 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 40 21%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 12%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 22 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 6%
Social Sciences 7 4%
Other 38 20%
Unknown 50 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 16. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2021.
All research outputs
#1,949,047
of 22,783,848 outputs
Outputs from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#82
of 893 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#38,865
of 367,028 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infectious Diseases of Poverty
#1
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,783,848 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 893 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 367,028 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.