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The epidemiology of road traffic injury hotspots in Kigali, Rwanda from police data

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

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9 tweeters

Citations

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35 Dimensions

Readers on

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217 Mendeley
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Title
The epidemiology of road traffic injury hotspots in Kigali, Rwanda from police data
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3359-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anjni Patel, Elizabeth Krebs, Luciano Andrade, Stephen Rulisa, João Ricardo N. Vissoci, Catherine A. Staton

Abstract

Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are the eighth-leading cause of death worldwide, with low- and middle-income countries sharing a disproportionate number of fatalities. African countries, like Rwanda, carry a higher burden of these fatalities and with increased economic growth, these numbers are expected to rise. We aim to describe the epidemiology of RTIs in Kigali Province, Rwanda and create a hotspot map of crashes from police data. Road traffic crash (RTC) report data from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2013 was collected from Kigali Traffic Police. In addition to analysis of descriptive data, locations of RTCs were mapped and analyzed through exploratory spatial data analysis to determine hotspots. A total of 2589 of RTCs were reported with 4689 total victims. The majority of victims were male (94.7 %) with an average age of 35.9 years. Cars were the most frequent vehicle involved (43.8 %), followed by motorcycles (14.5 %). Motorcycles had an increased risk of involvement in grievous crashes and pedestrians and cyclists were more likely to have grievous injuries. The hotspots identified were primarily located along the major roads crossing Kigali and the two busiest downtown areas. Despite significant headway by the government in RTC prevention, there continue to be high rates of RTIs in Rwanda, specifically with young males and a vulnerable road user population, such as pedestrians and motorcycle users. Improvements in police data and reporting by laypersons could prove valuable for further geographic information system analysis and efforts towards crash prevention and targeting education to motorcycle taxis could help reduce RTIs in a severely affected population.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 217 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 217 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 49 23%
Student > Bachelor 32 15%
Researcher 17 8%
Student > Postgraduate 17 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 7%
Other 43 20%
Unknown 44 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 54 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 40 18%
Engineering 22 10%
Social Sciences 17 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 3%
Other 27 12%
Unknown 50 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 April 2020.
All research outputs
#3,601,468
of 20,555,893 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,043
of 13,410 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,303
of 278,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#4
of 12 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,555,893 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 82nd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 13,410 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,699 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 12 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.