↓ Skip to main content

Avatars using computer/smartphone mediated communication and social networking in prevention of sexually transmitted diseases among North-Norwegian youngsters

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, October 2012
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (83rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
14 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
25 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
257 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Avatars using computer/smartphone mediated communication and social networking in prevention of sexually transmitted diseases among North-Norwegian youngsters
Published in
BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making, October 2012
DOI 10.1186/1472-6947-12-120
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elia Gabarron, J Artur Serrano, Rolf Wynn, Manuel Armayones

Abstract

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), especially the Chlamydia trachomatis bacterial infection, a common cause of infertility, are highly prevalent in developed countries, and a worrying problem in North Norway, where the incidence of chlamydia twice the Norwegian average. Seventy percent of reported chlamydia cases are found in people below 25 years of age, and although its spread could be controlled with proper prevention, young people are more aware of the risks of unwanted pregnancy than their risk of acquiring a STD. Information and Communication Technologies, including, the Internet, social media and/or smartphones, should be valued for sexual health promotion for their potential to engage young audiences. And in these media, avatars guarantee anonymity to users when handling sensitive information. The main objective of this project is to achieve that North Norwegian youngsters become more aware of STDs through the use of popular technologies among young people.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 14 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 257 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 1%
United Kingdom 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Norway 1 <1%
Unknown 247 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 55 21%
Researcher 36 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 11%
Student > Bachelor 25 10%
Student > Postgraduate 12 5%
Other 56 22%
Unknown 45 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 57 22%
Social Sciences 38 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 27 11%
Psychology 25 10%
Computer Science 20 8%
Other 41 16%
Unknown 49 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 22 October 2016.
All research outputs
#3,317,197
of 21,429,365 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
#281
of 1,879 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#25,664
of 177,860 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making
#26
of 155 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,429,365 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,879 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 177,860 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 155 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 83% of its contemporaries.