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Cardiorespiratory fitness as a predictor of intestinal microbial diversity and distinct metagenomic functions

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
3 news outlets
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
62 tweeters
peer_reviews
1 peer review site
facebook
5 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
2 Redditors
video
2 video uploaders

Citations

dimensions_citation
177 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
345 Mendeley
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Title
Cardiorespiratory fitness as a predictor of intestinal microbial diversity and distinct metagenomic functions
Published in
Microbiome, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40168-016-0189-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mehrbod Estaki, Jason Pither, Peter Baumeister, Jonathan P. Little, Sandeep K. Gill, Sanjoy Ghosh, Zahra Ahmadi-Vand, Katelyn R. Marsden, Deanna L. Gibson

Abstract

Reduced microbial diversity in human intestines has been implicated in various conditions such as diabetes, colorectal cancer, and inflammatory bowel disease. The role of physical fitness in the context of human intestinal microbiota is currently not known. We used high-throughput sequencing to analyze fecal microbiota of 39 healthy participants with similar age, BMI, and diets but with varying cardiorespiratory fitness levels. Fecal short-chain fatty acids were analyzed using gas chromatography. We showed that peak oxygen uptake (VO2peak), the gold standard measure of cardiorespiratory fitness, can account for more than 20 % of the variation in taxonomic richness, after accounting for all other factors, including diet. While VO2peak did not explain variation in beta diversity, it did play a significant role in explaining variation in the microbiomes' predicted metagenomic functions, aligning positively with genes related to bacterial chemotaxis, motility, and fatty acid biosynthesis. These predicted functions were supported by measured increases in production of fecal butyrate, a short-chain fatty acid associated with improved gut health, amongst physically fit participants. We also identified increased abundances of key butyrate-producing taxa (Clostridiales, Roseburia, Lachnospiraceae, and Erysipelotrichaceae) amongst these individuals, which likely contributed to the observed increases in butyrate levels. Results from this study show that cardiorespiratory fitness is correlated with increased microbial diversity in healthy humans and that the associated changes are anchored around a set of functional cores rather than specific taxa. The microbial profiles of fit individuals favor the production of butyrate. As increased microbiota diversity and butyrate production is associated with overall host health, our findings warrant the use of exercise prescription as an adjuvant therapy in combating dysbiosis-associated diseases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 62 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 345 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Ireland 1 <1%
Unknown 344 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 53 15%
Student > Master 50 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 14%
Student > Bachelor 38 11%
Other 24 7%
Other 63 18%
Unknown 68 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 62 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 51 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 28 8%
Sports and Recreations 24 7%
Other 49 14%
Unknown 93 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 78. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2021.
All research outputs
#362,935
of 19,148,527 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#97
of 1,155 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,761
of 275,000 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#1
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,148,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,155 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 40.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,000 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them