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Design and application of a target capture sequencing of exons and conserved non-coding sequences for the rat

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2016
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Title
Design and application of a target capture sequencing of exons and conserved non-coding sequences for the rat
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2975-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Minako Yoshihara, Daisuke Saito, Tetsuya Sato, Osamu Ohara, Takashi Kuramoto, Mikita Suyama

Abstract

Target capture sequencing is an efficient approach to directly identify the causative mutations of genetic disorders. To apply this strategy to laboratory rats exhibiting various phenotypes, we developed a novel target capture probe set, TargetEC (target capture for exons and conserved non-coding sequences), which can identify mutations not only in exonic regions but also in conserved non-coding sequences and thus can detect regulatory mutations. TargetEC covers 1,078,129 regions spanning 146.8 Mb of the genome. We applied TargetEC to four inbred rat strains (WTC/Kyo, WTC-swh/Kyo, PVG/Seac, and KFRS4/Kyo) maintained by the National BioResource Project for the Rat in Japan, and successfully identified mutations associated with these phenotypes, including one mutation detected in a conserved non-coding sequence. The method developed in this study can be used to efficiently identify regulatory mutations, which cannot be detected using conventional exome sequencing, and will help to deepen our understanding of the relationships between regulatory mutations and associated phenotypes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 13 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 13 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 31%
Student > Master 3 23%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 23%
Unspecified 1 8%
Student > Bachelor 1 8%
Other 1 8%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 38%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 15%
Unspecified 1 8%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 August 2016.
All research outputs
#14,583,933
of 16,534,657 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#7,870
of 9,071 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#225,300
of 268,699 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#36
of 40 outputs
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