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The Association between Individual Counselling and Health Behaviour Change: The See Kidney Disease (SeeKD) Targeted Screening Programme for Chronic Kidney Disease

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, July 2016
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2 tweeters

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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20 Mendeley
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Title
The Association between Individual Counselling and Health Behaviour Change: The See Kidney Disease (SeeKD) Targeted Screening Programme for Chronic Kidney Disease
Published in
Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease, July 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40697-016-0127-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lauren Galbraith, Brenda Hemmelgarn, Braden Manns, Susan Samuel, Joanne Kappel, Nadine Valk, Paul Ronksley

Abstract

Health behaviour change is an important component of management for patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD); however, the optimal method to promote health behaviour change for self-management of CKD is unknown. The See Kidney Disease (SeeKD) targeted screening programme screened Canadians at risk for CKD and promoted health behaviour change through individual counselling and goal setting. The objectives of this study are to determine the effectiveness of individual counselling sessions for eliciting behaviour change and to describe participant characteristics associated with behaviour change. This is a cross-sectional, descriptive study. The study setting is the National SeeKD targeted screening programme. The participants are all 'at risk' patients who were screened for CKD and returned a follow-up health behaviour survey (n = 1129). Health behaviour change was defined as a self-reported change in lifestyle, including dietary changes or medication adherence. An individual counselling session was provided to participants by allied healthcare professionals to promote health behaviour change. A survey was mailed to all participants at risk of CKD within 2-4 weeks following the screening event to determine if behaviour changes had been initiated. Descriptive statistics were used to describe respondent characteristics and self-reported behaviour change following screening events. Results were stratified by estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) (< 60 and ≥ 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2)). Log binomial regression analysis was used to determine the predictors of behaviour change. Of the 1129 respondents, the majority (89.8 %) reported making a health behaviour change after the screening event. Respondents who were overweight (body mass index [BMI] 25-29.9 kg/m(2)) or obese (BMI ≥ 30.0 kg/m(2)) were more likely to report a behaviour change (prevalence rate ratio (PRR) 0.66, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 0.44-0.99 and PRR 0.49, 95 % CI 0.30-0.80, respectively). Further, participants with a prior intent to change their behaviour were more likely to make a behaviour change (PRR 0.58, 95 % CI 0.35-0.96). Results did not vary by eGFR category. We are unable to determine the effectiveness of the behaviour change intervention given the lack of a control group. Potential response bias and social desirability bias must also be considered when interpreting the study findings. Individual counselling and goal setting provided at screening events may stimulate behaviour change amongst individuals at risk for CKD. However, further research is required to determine if this behaviour change is sustained and the impact on CKD progression and outcomes.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 20 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 20 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 15%
Student > Bachelor 3 15%
Librarian 2 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 10%
Student > Master 2 10%
Other 2 10%
Unknown 6 30%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 25%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 15%
Psychology 2 10%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 5%
Social Sciences 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 7 35%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 12 August 2016.
All research outputs
#11,484,747
of 17,687,978 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#308
of 384 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#156,020
of 272,818 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Journal of Kidney Health and Disease
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,687,978 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 384 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.4. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,818 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them