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Exploring wellbeing in first year medical students amidst a curriculum change

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Education, May 2021
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Title
Exploring wellbeing in first year medical students amidst a curriculum change
Published in
BMC Medical Education, May 2021
DOI 10.1186/s12909-021-02678-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Deborah Merrick, Yvonne Mbaki, Margaret K. Pratten, Timothy G. Simpson

Abstract

The support of student wellbeing features highly in all higher education institutional agendas. For medical students good physical and mental health can help prevent burnout, equip students for their future healthcare setting and indirectly improve patient care. At the University of Nottingham (UK), we were keen to explore undergraduate medical students perceived wellbeing before, during, and after an early years' (years 1-3) curriculum change. A restructure of the curriculum enabled personal wellbeing sessions to be embedded and directly linked to the pastoral support system. Students' perceived wellbeing was assessed through a questionnaire distributed to three cohorts of first year students at the start and end of the autumn semester. The data showed a clear improvement of perceived physical health at the end of the first semester following the curriculum change, alongside increased mood and ability to relax. A surprising outcome of this study was that students reported increased stress levels at the end of the semester, which we believe may be attributed to the change in assessment within the new curriculum. Our medical students are now facing end of year summative examinations, but are acutely aware of their progress as they undertake frequent formative assessments during the year. We propose that comparison of performance with peers is having a direct impact on perceived stress in these cohorts. The study has shown that embedding wellbeing in the curriculum can have positive effects even within a changing curriculum. The importance of evolving wellbeing provision and support based on the needs of the student population is essential and probably never more in need than at this moment in time.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 2 11%
Lecturer 2 11%
Other 1 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 6%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 9 50%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 28%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 6%
Psychology 1 6%
Arts and Humanities 1 6%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 9 50%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2021.
All research outputs
#12,082,356
of 18,461,354 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Education
#1,793
of 2,579 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#193,271
of 331,720 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Education
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,461,354 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,579 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.6. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 331,720 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 33rd percentile – i.e., 33% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them