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Serum GFAP and NfL as disease severity and prognostic biomarkers in patients with aquaporin-4 antibody-positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neuroinflammation, May 2021
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 news outlet
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7 tweeters

Citations

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25 Dimensions

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36 Mendeley
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Title
Serum GFAP and NfL as disease severity and prognostic biomarkers in patients with aquaporin-4 antibody-positive neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder
Published in
Journal of Neuroinflammation, May 2021
DOI 10.1186/s12974-021-02138-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Patrick Schindler, Ulrike Grittner, Johanna Oechtering, David Leppert, Nadja Siebert, Ankelien S. Duchow, Frederike C. Oertel, Susanna Asseyer, Joseph Kuchling, Hanna G. Zimmermann, Alexander U. Brandt, Pascal Benkert, Markus Reindl, Sven Jarius, Friedemann Paul, Judith Bellmann-Strobl, Jens Kuhle, Klemens Ruprecht

Abstract

Neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) is a frequently disabling neuroinflammatory syndrome with a relapsing course. Blood-based disease severity and prognostic biomarkers for NMOSD are a yet unmet clinical need. Here, we evaluated serum glial fibrillary acidic protein (sGFAP) and neurofilament light (sNfL) as disease severity and prognostic biomarkers in patients with aquaporin-4 immunoglobulin (Ig)G positive (AQP4-IgG+) NMOSD. sGFAP and sNfL were determined by single-molecule array technology in a prospective cohort of 33 AQP4-IgG+ patients with NMOSD, 32 of which were in clinical remission at study baseline. Sixteen myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein IgG-positive (MOG-IgG+) patients and 38 healthy persons were included as controls. Attacks were recorded in all AQP4-IgG+ patients over a median observation period of 4.25 years. In patients with AQP4-IgG+ NMOSD, median sGFAP (109.2 pg/ml) was non-significantly higher than in MOG-IgG+ patients (81.1 pg/ml; p = 0.83) and healthy controls (67.7 pg/ml; p = 0.07); sNfL did not substantially differ between groups. Yet, in AQP4-IgG+, but not MOG-IgG+ patients, higher sGFAP was associated with worse clinical disability scores, including the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS, standardized effect size = 1.30, p = 0.007) and Multiple Sclerosis Functional Composite (MSFC, standardized effect size = - 1.28, p = 0.01). While in AQP4-IgG+, but not MOG-IgG+ patients, baseline sGFAP and sNfL were positively associated (standardized effect size = 2.24, p = 0.001), higher sNfL was only non-significantly associated with worse EDSS (standardized effect size = 1.09, p = 0.15) and MSFC (standardized effect size = - 1.75, p = 0.06) in patients with AQP4-IgG+ NMOSD. Patients with AQP4-IgG+ NMOSD with sGFAP > 90 pg/ml at baseline had a shorter time to a future attack than those with sGFAP ≤ 90 pg/ml (adjusted hazard ratio [95% confidence interval] = 11.6 [1.3-105.6], p = 0.03). In contrast, baseline sNfL levels above the 75th age adjusted percentile were not associated with a shorter time to a future attack in patients with AQP4-IgG+ NMOSD. These findings suggest a potential role for sGFAP as biomarker for disease severity and future disease activity in patients with AQP4-IgG+ NMOSD in phases of clinical remission.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 4 11%
Other 4 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 8%
Student > Postgraduate 3 8%
Unspecified 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 15 42%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 10 28%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 11%
Unspecified 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 16 44%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 09 June 2021.
All research outputs
#2,998,164
of 22,489,892 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#556
of 2,586 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#67,065
of 342,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neuroinflammation
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,489,892 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,586 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 342,197 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them