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Does home equipment contribute to socioeconomic gradients in Australian children’s physical activity, sedentary time and screen time?

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
192 Mendeley
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Title
Does home equipment contribute to socioeconomic gradients in Australian children’s physical activity, sedentary time and screen time?
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3419-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dot Dumuid, Timothy S. Olds, Lucy K. Lewis, Carol Maher

Abstract

Activity behaviours (physical activity, sedentary time and screen time) have been linked to health outcomes in childhood. Furthermore, socioeconomic disparities have been observed in both children's activity behaviours and health outcomes. Children's physical home environments may play a role in these relationships. This study aimed to examine the associations and interactions between children's physical home environment, socioeconomic status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and screen time. Australian children (n = 528) aged 9-11 years from randomly selected schools participated in the cross-sectional International Study of Childhood Obesity, Lifestyle and the Environment. Children's physical home environment (access to equipment), socioeconomic status (household income and parental education) and demographic variables (gender and family structure) were determined by parental questionnaire. Moderate-to-vigorous physical activity and sedentary time were measured objectively by 7-day 24-h accelerometry. Screen time was obtained from child survey. The associations between the physical home environment, socioeconomic status and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, sedentary time and screen time were examined for 427 children, using analysis of covariance, and linear and logistic regression, with adjustment for gender and family structure. The presence of TVs (p < 0.01) and video game consoles (p < 0.01) in children's bedrooms, and child possession of handheld video games (p = 0.04), cell phones (p < 0.01) and music devices (p = 0.04) was significantly and positively associated with screen time. Ownership of these devices (with the exception of music devices) was inversely related to socioeconomic status (parental education). Children's moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (p = 0.04) and possession of active play equipment (p = 0.04) were both positively associated with socioeconomic status (household income), but were not related to each other (with the exception of bicycle ownership). Children with less electronic devices, particularly in their bedrooms, participated in less screen time, regardless of socioeconomic status. Socioeconomic disparities were identified in children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity, however socioeconomic status was inconsistently related to possession of active play equipment. Home active play equipment was therefore not a clear contributor to the socioeconomic gradients in Australian children's moderate-to-vigorous physical activity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 192 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 191 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 32 17%
Student > Master 30 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 8%
Researcher 14 7%
Other 34 18%
Unknown 46 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 33 17%
Sports and Recreations 24 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 23 12%
Social Sciences 13 7%
Computer Science 10 5%
Other 35 18%
Unknown 54 28%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 43. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 August 2016.
All research outputs
#214,683
of 8,250,529 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#210
of 6,967 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,812
of 256,327 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#21
of 369 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,250,529 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,967 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 256,327 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 369 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.