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An overview of point-of-care ultrasound for soft tissue and musculoskeletal applications in the emergency department

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Intensive Care, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#46 of 408)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
24 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
19 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
75 Mendeley
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Title
An overview of point-of-care ultrasound for soft tissue and musculoskeletal applications in the emergency department
Published in
Journal of Intensive Care, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s40560-016-0173-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kuo-Chih Chen, Aming Chor-Ming Lin, Chee-Fah Chong, Tzong-Luen Wang

Abstract

The skin, soft tissue, and most parts of the musculoskeletal system are relatively superficial anatomical structures and ideal targets for ultrasound examination in the emergency departments. Soft tissue and musculoskeletal ultrasound applications are relatively underused compared to traditional emergency applications, such as trauma, abdominal aortic aneurysm, and chest and cardiovascular systems. It is important to have knowledge about sonoanatomy and landmarks within the skin, soft tissue, and musculoskeletal systems. Portable machines equipped with high-resolution transducers are now available to fulfill this field of applications in many emergency departments. After needling practice, emergency physicians can not only diagnose and identify pathological findings but also provide interventional procedures and treatments. In this review, we will introduce point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) applications regarding the soft tissue and musculoskeletal systems: soft tissue infections, joint effusions, foreign bodies, long bone fractures, muscle and tendon injuries, vascular occlusions, and procedures. With POCUS, emergency physicians can visualize the structures beneath the skin and provide better and safer cares in the emergency departments.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 1%
Unknown 74 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 12 16%
Student > Postgraduate 8 11%
Student > Bachelor 8 11%
Researcher 7 9%
Professor > Associate Professor 5 7%
Other 22 29%
Unknown 13 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 44 59%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Engineering 2 3%
Computer Science 2 3%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 1%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 17 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 22. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 29 October 2018.
All research outputs
#1,023,862
of 17,027,788 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Intensive Care
#46
of 408 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#22,866
of 270,089 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Intensive Care
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,027,788 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 408 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,089 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them