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Sustaining control: lessons from the Lubombo spatial development initiative in southern Africa

Overview of attention for article published in Malaria Journal, August 2016
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Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

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27 Dimensions

Readers on

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50 Mendeley
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Title
Sustaining control: lessons from the Lubombo spatial development initiative in southern Africa
Published in
Malaria Journal, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12936-016-1453-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rajendra Maharaj, Devanand Moonasar, Candrinho Baltazar, Simon Kunene, Natashia Morris

Abstract

The Lubombo Spatial Development Initiative (LSDI) was a tri-country project between South Africa, Swaziland and Mozambique with the aim of accelerating socio-economic development in the region. The malaria component of the project was introduced to decrease the transmission of malaria in the region. This goal was met but with termination of this project resulted in an upsurge of malaria cases in the sub-region mainly as a result of migration from high transmission areas to low transmission ones. The movement of people across borders in southern Africa remains a challenge in sustaining malaria control and elimination. Malaria case data for Swaziland and South Africa were obtained from their respective national Malaria Information Systems. Data for Mozambique was obtained from the Mozambican Ministry of Health. Data obtained during the course of the LSDI project was compared to the case data post the termination of the LSDI. The 12-year period of the LSDI showed a substantial decrease in disease burden amongst the three countries involved when compared to the baseline year of 2000. The decrease in malaria cases was 99 % in South Africa and 98 % in Swaziland. Malaria prevalence in Mozambique decreased by 85 % over the same period. However, after the LSDI ended, between 2012 and 2014, there was an upward trend in case data that was counter to the goal of elimination. South Africa and Swaziland benefitted from the LSDI and were able to sustain malaria control and progress to the stage of elimination. Mozambique could not sustain the gains made during the LSDI and case numbers increased. Technical and financial resources are key challenges for malaria control and elimination interventions.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 50 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 50 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 11 22%
Researcher 10 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Postgraduate 4 8%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 10 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 30%
Social Sciences 5 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 8%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 3 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 4%
Other 10 20%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 January 2017.
All research outputs
#14,730,301
of 22,882,389 outputs
Outputs from Malaria Journal
#4,210
of 5,579 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#216,160
of 355,875 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Malaria Journal
#102
of 153 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,882,389 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,579 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 355,875 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 153 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.