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ClpP-deletion impairs the virulence of Legionella pneumophila and the optimal translocation of effector proteins

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, August 2016
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Title
ClpP-deletion impairs the virulence of Legionella pneumophila and the optimal translocation of effector proteins
Published in
BMC Microbiology, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0790-8
Pubmed ID
Authors

Bei-bei Zhao, Xiang-hui Li, Yong-lun Zeng, Yong-jun Lu

Abstract

The opportunistic bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila uses substrate effectors of Dot/Icm type IVB secretion system (T4BSS) to accomplish survival and replication in amoebae cells and mammalian alveolar macrophages. During the conversion between its highly resistant, infectious dormant form and vigorously growing, uninfectious replicative form, L. pneumophila utilizes a complicated regulatory network in which proteolysis may play a significant role. As a highly conserved core protease, ClpP is involved in various cellular processes as well as virulence in bacteria, and has been proved to be required for the expression of transmission traits and cell division of L. pneumophila. The clpP-deficient L. pneumophila strain failed to replicate and was digested in the first 3 h post-infection in mammalian cells J774A.1. Further investigation demonstrates that the clpP deficient mutant strain was unable to escape the endosome-lysosomal pathway in host cells. We also found that the clpP deficient mutant strain still expresses T4BSS components, induces contact-dependent cytotoxicity and translocate effector proteins RalF and LegK2, indicating that its T4BSS was overall functional. Interestingly, we further found that the translocation of several effector proteins is significantly reduced without ClpP. The data indicate that ClpP plays an important role in regulating the virulence and effector translocation of Legionella pneumophila.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Student > Master 8 24%
Student > Bachelor 5 15%
Researcher 4 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 6%
Other 3 9%
Unknown 3 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 19 56%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 9%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 6%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 6%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 6%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 4 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 August 2016.
All research outputs
#20,337,210
of 22,882,389 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#2,694
of 3,195 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#321,779
of 366,905 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#84
of 96 outputs
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