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Comparative genomic analysis and phylogenetic position of Theileria equi

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (75th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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72 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
103 Mendeley
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Title
Comparative genomic analysis and phylogenetic position of Theileria equi
Published in
BMC Genomics, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1471-2164-13-603
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lowell S Kappmeyer, Mathangi Thiagarajan, David R Herndon, Joshua D Ramsay, Elisabet Caler, Appolinaire Djikeng, Joseph J Gillespie, Audrey OT Lau, Eric H Roalson, Joana C Silva, Marta G Silva, Carlos E Suarez, Massaro W Ueti, Vishvanath M Nene, Robert H Mealey, Donald P Knowles, Kelly A Brayton

Abstract

Transmission of arthropod-borne apicomplexan parasites that cause disease and result in death or persistent infection represents a major challenge to global human and animal health. First described in 1901 as Piroplasma equi, this re-emergent apicomplexan parasite was renamed Babesia equi and subsequently Theileria equi, reflecting an uncertain taxonomy. Understanding mechanisms by which apicomplexan parasites evade immune or chemotherapeutic elimination is required for development of effective vaccines or chemotherapeutics. The continued risk of transmission of T. equi from clinically silent, persistently infected equids impedes the goal of returning the U. S. to non-endemic status. Therefore comparative genomic analysis of T. equi was undertaken to: 1) identify genes contributing to immune evasion and persistence in equid hosts, 2) identify genes involved in PBMC infection biology and 3) define the phylogenetic position of T. equi relative to sequenced apicomplexan parasites.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 103 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Germany 2 2%
United States 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 99 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 21 20%
Researcher 15 15%
Student > Master 14 14%
Student > Bachelor 10 10%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 23 22%
Unknown 13 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 39 38%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 17 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 15 15%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 8%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 2%
Other 9 9%
Unknown 13 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 5. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 August 2016.
All research outputs
#3,000,579
of 12,373,620 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,661
of 7,313 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,794
of 135,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#19
of 78 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,373,620 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 75th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,313 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 76% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 135,951 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 78 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its contemporaries.