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Where to from here? Identifying and prioritising future directions for addressing drug-resistant infection in Australia

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, May 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (54th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
5 tweeters

Readers on

mendeley
9 Mendeley
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Title
Where to from here? Identifying and prioritising future directions for addressing drug-resistant infection in Australia
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, May 2021
DOI 10.1186/s13756-021-00953-4
Pubmed ID
Authors

Gregory Merlo, Minyon Avent, Trent Yarwood, Bonnie Smith, Mieke van Driel, Lisa Hall

Abstract

The Australian National Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy calls for a collaborative effort to change practices that have contributed to the development of drug-resistance and for implementation of new initiatives to reduce antibiotic use. A facilitated workshop was undertaken at the 2019 National Australian Antimicrobial Resistance Forum to explore the complexity of antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) implementation in Australia and prioritise future action. Participants engaged in rotating rounds of discussion using a world café format addressing six topics relating to AMS implementation. Once all tables had discussed all themes the discussion concluded and notes were summarised. The documents were independently openly coded by two researchers to identify elements relating to the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship. There were 39 participants in the facilitated discussions, including pharmacists, infectious disease physicians, infection prevention nurses, and others. Participants discussed strategies they had found successful, including having a regular presence in clinical areas, adapting messaging and implementation strategies for different disciplines, maintaining positivity, and being patient-focused. Many of the recommendations for the next step involved being patient focussed and outcomesdriven. This involves linking data to practice, using patient stories, using data to celebrate wins and creating incentives. Recommendations from the workshop should be included in priority setting for the implementation of AMS initiatives across Australia.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 1 11%
Researcher 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Unknown 6 67%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 2 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 11%
Unknown 6 67%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 June 2021.
All research outputs
#11,761,506
of 20,503,899 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#711
of 1,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#154,748
of 346,786 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 20,503,899 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,165 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.1. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 346,786 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 54% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them