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Stress-related asthma and family therapy: Case study

Overview of attention for article published in Annals of General Psychiatry, January 2012
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Title
Stress-related asthma and family therapy: Case study
Published in
Annals of General Psychiatry, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/1744-859x-11-28
Pubmed ID
Authors

Maria Theodoratou-Bekou, Ourania Andreopoulou, Panoraia Andriopoulou, Beatrice Wood

Abstract

This paper applies the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM) of stress- related illness to the study and treatment of an adolescent with intractable asthma. The model is described, along with supportive research findings. Then a case study is presented, demonstrating how the model is clinically applied. We tell the story of an asthmatic adolescent presenting for therapy due to her intense asthmatic crises, and the case is presented to exemplify how the BBFM can help understand the family-psychobiological contribution to exacerbation of disease activity, and therefore guide treatment towards the amelioration of severe physical symptoms. Facets of the patient's intra-familial interactions are consistent with the BBFM, which support clinical validation of the model. In the case described, it is likely that additional asthma medications would not have had the desired ameliorative effect, because they did not target the family relational processes contributing to the symptoms. The recognition of the influences of family relational processes on the disease was crucial for effective intervention. The therapy incorporates and weaves together BBFM understanding of family patterns of interaction and physiological/medical concerns integrated with Bowenian intervention strategies. This case study validates the importance and usefulness of BBFM for intervention with stress-sensitive illnesses such as asthma.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 31 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Greece 1 3%
Unknown 29 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Doctoral Student 5 16%
Other 4 13%
Student > Master 4 13%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Student > Bachelor 3 10%
Other 8 26%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 42%
Social Sciences 4 13%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 13%
Computer Science 1 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 3%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2012.
All research outputs
#9,970,706
of 12,454,625 outputs
Outputs from Annals of General Psychiatry
#233
of 311 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,306
of 139,679 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Annals of General Psychiatry
#2
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,454,625 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 311 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.9. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 139,679 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.