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Oncolytic virus efficiency inhibited growth of tumour cells with multiple drug resistant phenotype in vivo and in vitro

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2016
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Title
Oncolytic virus efficiency inhibited growth of tumour cells with multiple drug resistant phenotype in vivo and in vitro
Published in
Journal of Translational Medicine, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12967-016-1002-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elena P. Goncharova, Julia S. Ruzhenkova, Ivan S. Petrov, Sergey N. Shchelkunov, Marina A. Zenkova

Abstract

Tumour resistance to a wide range of drugs (multiple drug resistant, MDR) acquired after intensive chemotherapy is considered to be the main obstacle of the curative treatment of cancer patients. Recent work has shown that oncolytic viruses demonstrated prominent potential for effective treatment of diverse cancers. Here, we evaluated whether genetically modified vaccinia virus (LIVP-GFP) may be effective in treatment of cancers displaying MDR phenotype. LIVP-GFP replication, transgene expression and cytopathic effects were analysed in human cervical carcinomas KB-3-1 (MDR-), KB-8-5 (MDR+) and in murine melanoma B-16 (MDR-), murine lymphosarcomas RLS and RLS-40 (MDR+). To investigate the efficacy of this therapy in vivo, we treated immunocompetent mice bearing murine lymphosarcoma RLS-40 (MDR+) (6- to 8-week-old female CBA mice; n = 10/group) or melanoma B-16 (MDR-) (6- to 8-week-old female C57Bl mice; n = 6/group) with LIVP-GFP (5 × 10(7) PFU of virus in 0.1 mL of IMDM immediately and 4 days after tumour implantation). We demonstrated that LIVP-GFP replication was effective in human cervical carcinomas KB-3-1 (MDR-) and KB-8-5 (MDR+) and in murine melanoma B-16 (MDR-), whereas active viral production was not detected in murine lymphosarcomas RLS and RLS-40 (MDR+). Additionally, it was found that in tumour models in immunocompetent mice under the optimized regimen intratumoural injections of LIVP-GFP significantly inhibited melanoma B16 (33 % of mice were with complete response after 90 days) and RLS-40 tumour growth (fourfold increase in tumour doubling time) as well as metastasis. The anti-tumour activity of LIVP-GFP is a result of direct oncolysis of tumour cells in case of melanoma B-16 because the virus effectively replicates and destroys these cells, and virus-mediated activation of the host immune system followed by immunologically mediated destruction of of tumour cells in case of lymphosarcoma RLS-40. Thus, the recombinant vaccinia virus LIVP-GFP is able to inhibit the growth of malignant cells with the MDR phenotype and tumour metastasis when administered in the early stages of tumour development.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Canada 1 5%
Unknown 21 95%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 6 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 14%
Researcher 3 14%
Student > Master 3 14%
Other 1 5%
Other 1 5%
Unknown 5 23%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 23%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 18%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 9%
Psychology 1 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 5%
Other 2 9%
Unknown 7 32%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 18 August 2016.
All research outputs
#4,382,024
of 8,243,836 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Translational Medicine
#1,033
of 1,823 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#139,643
of 253,828 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Translational Medicine
#47
of 85 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,243,836 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,823 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.8. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,828 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 85 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.