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The extent and nature of television food advertising to children in Xi’an, China

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (82nd percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
66 Mendeley
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Title
The extent and nature of television food advertising to children in Xi’an, China
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3468-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danyang Li, Ting Wang, Yue Cheng, Min Zhang, Xue Yang, Zhonghai Zhu, Danli Liu, Wenfang Yang, Lingxia Zeng

Abstract

To explore the extent and nature of television food advertising especially unhealthy food advertising to primary school children in Xi'an, China. Television data were recorded for 2 weekdays and 2 weekend days between 6:00 and 22:00 during May and June in 2012 from a total of five television channels most popular with children in Xi'an. Pearson χ (2) tests and logistic regression were applied to determine differences in the proportion of healthy food, unhealthy food and miscellaneous food advertisements for different channels, programs, dates, viewing periods and the use of persuasive marketing tactics. Of the 5527 advertisements transcribed, 25.5 % were for food, among which 48.1 % were considered to be unhealthy. The frequency of food advertisements was 6 per hour per channel, including 3 unhealthy food advertisements. Compared with healthy and miscellaneous food advertisements, more unhealthy food advertisements were shown during afternoon, weekends and children's non-peak viewing times as well as on children's television channels, central television channels and non-children's programmes. Unhealthy foods contributed the highest proportion of all food advertisements containing promotional characters (51.7 %) and premium offers (59.1 %). Both promotional characters and premium offers appeared more on non-children's television channels. The majority of food advertisements were for unhealthy food. More unhealthy food ads were shown in children's non-peak time and afternoon as well as non-children's channels. More children-oriented persuasive marketing tactics were used in unhealthy food ads especially in non-children's channels. Therefore, intervening in the entrance of unhealthy foods into the market and establishing regulations related to food advertising especially unhealthy food advertisements are important strategies to prevent children's exposure to unhealthy food and childhood obesity.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 66 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 66 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 21%
Student > Bachelor 11 17%
Researcher 10 15%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 12%
Other 5 8%
Other 8 12%
Unknown 10 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Social Sciences 11 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 9%
Business, Management and Accounting 6 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 8%
Other 12 18%
Unknown 16 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 9. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2018.
All research outputs
#2,734,205
of 17,361,274 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#3,019
of 11,737 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#51,968
of 271,426 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#4
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,361,274 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,737 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,426 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its contemporaries.