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Pathogenic aquaporin-4 reactive T cells are sufficient to induce mouse model of neuromyelitis optica

Overview of attention for article published in Acta Neuropathologica Communications, May 2015
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (80th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (52nd percentile)

Citations

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49 Mendeley
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Title
Pathogenic aquaporin-4 reactive T cells are sufficient to induce mouse model of neuromyelitis optica
Published in
Acta Neuropathologica Communications, May 2015
DOI 10.1186/s40478-015-0207-1
Pubmed ID
Authors

Melina V. Jones, Hwa Huang, Peter A. Calabresi, Michael Levy

Abstract

Neuromyelitis Optica (NMO) is an autoimmune disease primarily targeting the spinal cord and optic nerve leading to paralysis and blindness. The discovery of an antibody against the astrocytic water channel, aquaporin-4 (AQP4), in the majority of patients, has led to the presumption that the antibody was necessary for disease pathogenesis. The potential role of T cells in the central nervous system, however, has not been thoroughly examined. We generated an anti-AQP4 antibody seronegative model of NMO using pathogenic AQP4-reactive T cells in mice by immunizing AQP4 null mice with peptides corresponding to the second extracellular loop of AQP4, loop C. When polarized to a Th17 phenotype and transferred to wild-type mice, these cells caused tail and limb weakness. Histology showed demyelination and T cell infiltration in the spinal cord, optic nerve and brain. Animals receiving cells re-stimulated in culture with non-specific proteins resulted in no behavioral disease, indicating that specific targeting of AQP4 is essential for this phenotype. In summary, we show that AQP4-reactive T cells are sufficient to trigger an NMO-like disease in mice, independent of antibodies, indicating that pathogenic AQP4-reactive T cells may play a similar role in humans.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
Unknown 47 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 11 22%
Student > Postgraduate 7 14%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 10%
Student > Bachelor 4 8%
Other 8 16%
Unknown 8 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 12 24%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 8 16%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 10%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 11 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 January 2017.
All research outputs
#1,217,792
of 8,900,478 outputs
Outputs from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#148
of 430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#49,062
of 258,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Acta Neuropathologica Communications
#16
of 34 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,900,478 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 86th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 65% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 258,125 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 34 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 52% of its contemporaries.