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Echocardiography in shock management

Overview of attention for article published in Critical Care, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
213 tweeters
facebook
11 Facebook pages
wikipedia
3 Wikipedia pages

Citations

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64 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
387 Mendeley
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Title
Echocardiography in shock management
Published in
Critical Care, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13054-016-1401-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anthony S. McLean

Abstract

Echocardiography is pivotal in the diagnosis and management of the shocked patient. Important characteristics in the setting of shock are that it is non-invasive and can be rapidly applied.In the acute situation a basic study often yields immediate results allowing for the initiation of therapy, while a follow-up advanced study brings the advantage of further refining the diagnosis and providing an in-depth hemodynamic assessment. Competency in basic critical care echocardiography is now regarded as a mandatory part of critical care training with clear guidelines available. The majority of pathologies found in shocked patients are readily identified using basic level 2D and M-mode echocardiography. A more comprehensive diagnosis can be achieved with advanced levels of competency, for which practice guidelines are also now available. Hemodynamic evaluation and ongoing monitoring are possible with advanced levels of competency, which includes the use of colour Doppler, spectral Doppler, and tissue Doppler imaging and occasionally the use of more recent technological advances such as 3D or speckled tracking.The four core types of shock-cardiogenic, hypovolemic, obstructive, and vasoplegic-can readily be identified by echocardiography. Even within each of the main headings contained in the shock classification, a variety of pathologies may be the cause and echocardiography will differentiate which of these is responsible. Increasingly, as a result of more complex and elderly patients, the shock may be multifactorial, such as a combination of cardiogenic and septic shock or hypovolemia and ventricular outflow obstruction.The diagnostic benefit of echocardiography in the shocked patient is obvious. The increasing prevalence of critical care physicians experienced in advanced techniques means echocardiography often supplants the need for more invasive hemodynamic assessment and monitoring in shock.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 213 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 387 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Spain 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Unknown 377 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 62 16%
Other 62 16%
Researcher 49 13%
Student > Master 44 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 7%
Other 95 25%
Unknown 47 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 294 76%
Nursing and Health Professions 10 3%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 1%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 1%
Neuroscience 4 1%
Other 12 3%
Unknown 57 15%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 137. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2021.
All research outputs
#202,993
of 19,913,701 outputs
Outputs from Critical Care
#102
of 5,661 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,994
of 283,591 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Critical Care
#2
of 53 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,913,701 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,661 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 283,591 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 53 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.