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Community readiness for adolescents’ overweight and obesity prevention is low in urban South Africa: a case study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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Title
Community readiness for adolescents’ overweight and obesity prevention is low in urban South Africa: a case study
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3451-9
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rebecca Pradeilles, Emily K. Rousham, Shane A. Norris, Joanna M. Kesten, Paula L. Griffiths

Abstract

South Africa is undergoing epidemiological and nutrition transitions with associated increases in the incidence of overweight, obesity and diet-related chronic diseases. With the emergence of the nutrition transition in South Africa, there is an urgent need for interventions to prevent overweight and obesity in children and adolescents as risk factors for chronic diseases in adolescence may track throughout later life. This research explored the potential for faith-based organisations (FBOs) to be used as community organisations for overweight and obesity prevention interventions in adolescents by assessing the readiness of religious leaders to engage in such interventions. Surveys and focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted with 51 religious leaders in Johannesburg and Soweto. The Community Readiness Model (CRM) survey was chosen to determine the stage of readiness of this community regarding overweight and obesity prevention. Six different dimensions were assessed in the CRM (community efforts, knowledge of efforts, leadership, community climate, knowledge of the issue, resources). The surveys were scored according to the CRM protocol. The survey data were supplemented with findings from FGDs. Thematic analysis was used to analyse the FGDs. The mean community readiness score was 2.57 ± 0.76 which equates with the "denial/resistance stage". The mean readiness score for resources was the highest of all the dimensions (3.77 ± 0.28), followed by knowledge of the issue (3.20 ± 0.51). The lowest score was seen for community knowledge of efforts (1.77 ± 1.50), followed by community climate (2.00 ± 0.64). FGDs helped interpret the CRM scores. FGDs showed that religious leaders were enthusiastic and recognised that their role was not limited solely to spiritual guidance and mentoring, but also to physical well-being. Religious leaders recognised that they act as role models within the community and thus have a role to play in improving adolescent health. They have some knowledge about the overweight/obesity issue and some of the resources could be made available to support overweight/obesity prevention-related initiatives. However, the low community knowledge of efforts and the negative prevailing attitude of the community towards overweight and obesity highlight the need to increase awareness of this issue prior to implementing initiatives on overweight and obesity prevention.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 184 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 184 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 30 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 22 12%
Researcher 20 11%
Student > Bachelor 20 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 16 9%
Other 42 23%
Unknown 34 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 33 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 33 18%
Social Sciences 18 10%
Psychology 13 7%
Sports and Recreations 11 6%
Other 29 16%
Unknown 47 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 August 2016.
All research outputs
#14,574,930
of 18,255,134 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#10,641
of 12,281 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#197,065
of 272,773 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#17
of 17 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,255,134 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,281 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.9. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 17 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.