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Fruit bats adjust their foraging strategies to urban environments to diversify their diet

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Biology, June 2021
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
10 news outlets
twitter
38 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
5 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
49 Mendeley
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Title
Fruit bats adjust their foraging strategies to urban environments to diversify their diet
Published in
BMC Biology, June 2021
DOI 10.1186/s12915-021-01060-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Egert-Berg, Katya, Handel, Michal, Goldshtein, Aya, Eitan, Ofri, Borissov, Ivailo, Yovel, Yossi

Abstract

Urbanization is one of the most influential processes on our globe, putting a great number of species under threat. Some species learn to cope with urbanization, and a few even benefit from it, but we are only starting to understand how they do so. In this study, we GPS tracked Egyptian fruit bats from urban and rural populations to compare their movement and foraging in urban and rural environments. Because fruit trees are distributed differently in these two environments, with a higher diversity in urban environments, we hypothesized that foraging strategies will differ too. When foraging in urban environments, bats were much more exploratory than when foraging in rural environments, visiting more sites per hour and switching foraging sites more often on consecutive nights. By doing so, bats foraging in settlements diversified their diet in comparison to rural bats, as was also evident from their choice to often switch fruit species. Interestingly, the location of the roost did not dictate the foraging grounds, and we found that many bats choose to roost in the countryside but nightly commute to and forage in urban environments. Bats are unique among small mammals in their ability to move far rapidly. Our study is an excellent example of how animals adjust to environmental changes, and it shows how such mobile mammals might exploit the new urban fragmented environment that is taking over our landscape.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 38 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 49 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 16%
Researcher 7 14%
Student > Bachelor 6 12%
Unspecified 2 4%
Student > Master 2 4%
Other 4 8%
Unknown 20 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 18 37%
Unspecified 2 4%
Environmental Science 2 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 4%
Psychology 1 2%
Other 1 2%
Unknown 23 47%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 107. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 August 2021.
All research outputs
#321,481
of 22,518,353 outputs
Outputs from BMC Biology
#73
of 1,961 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#7,584
of 296,595 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,518,353 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,961 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 296,595 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them