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Living apart together: crosstalk between the core and supernumerary genomes in a fungal plant pathogen

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, August 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (77th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

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11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

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47 Dimensions

Readers on

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70 Mendeley
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Title
Living apart together: crosstalk between the core and supernumerary genomes in a fungal plant pathogen
Published in
BMC Genomics, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12864-016-2941-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Adriaan Vanheule, Kris Audenaert, Sven Warris, Henri van de Geest, Elio Schijlen, Monica Höfte, Sarah De Saeger, Geert Haesaert, Cees Waalwijk, Theo van der Lee

Abstract

Eukaryotes display remarkable genome plasticity, which can include supernumerary chromosomes that differ markedly from the core chromosomes. Despite the widespread occurrence of supernumerary chromosomes in fungi, their origin, relation to the core genome and the reason for their divergent characteristics are still largely unknown. The complexity of genome assembly due to the presence of repetitive DNA partially accounts for this. Here we use single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing to assemble the genome of a prominent fungal wheat pathogen, Fusarium poae, including at least one supernumerary chromosome. The core genome contains limited transposable elements (TEs) and no gene duplications, while the supernumerary genome holds up to 25 % TEs and multiple gene duplications. The core genome shows all hallmarks of repeat-induced point mutation (RIP), a defense mechanism against TEs, specific for fungi. The absence of RIP on the supernumerary genome accounts for the differences between the two (sub)genomes, and results in a functional crosstalk between them. The supernumerary genome is a reservoir for TEs that migrate to the core genome, and even large blocks of supernumerary sequence (>200 kb) have recently translocated to the core. Vice versa, the supernumerary genome acts as a refuge for genes that are duplicated from the core genome. For the first time, a mechanism was determined that explains the differences that exist between the core and supernumerary genome in fungi. Different biology rather than origin was shown to be responsible. A "living apart together" crosstalk exists between the core and supernumerary genome, accelerating chromosomal and organismal evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 70 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 3%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 67 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 23%
Student > Master 10 14%
Student > Postgraduate 7 10%
Student > Bachelor 6 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 6 9%
Other 12 17%
Unknown 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 32 46%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 16 23%
Chemistry 3 4%
Environmental Science 2 3%
Engineering 2 3%
Other 3 4%
Unknown 12 17%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 September 2017.
All research outputs
#2,093,852
of 12,577,568 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#1,164
of 7,421 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#59,572
of 261,750 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#10
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,577,568 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 83rd percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,421 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 261,750 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 80% of its contemporaries.