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The influence of travel time on emergency obstetric care seeking behavior in the urban poor of Bangladesh: a GIS study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2016
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

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4 tweeters

Citations

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20 Dimensions

Readers on

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159 Mendeley
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Title
The influence of travel time on emergency obstetric care seeking behavior in the urban poor of Bangladesh: a GIS study
Published in
BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12884-016-1032-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rocco Panciera, Akib Khan, Syed Jafar Raza Rizvi, Shakil Ahmed, Tanvir Ahmed, Rubana Islam, Alayne M. Adams

Abstract

Availability of Emergency Obstetric Care (EmOC) is crucial to avert maternal death due to life-threatening complications potentially arising during delivery. Research on the determinants of utilization of EmOC has neglected urban settings, where traffic congestion can pose a significant barrier to the access of EmOC facilities, particularly for the urban poor due to costly and limited transportation options. This study investigates the impact of travel time to EmOC facilities on the utilization of facility-based delivery services among mothers living in urban poor settlements in Sylhet, Bangladesh. A cross-sectional EmOC health-seeking behavior survey from 39 poor urban clusters was geo-spatially linked to a comprehensive geo-referenced dataset of EmOC facility locations. Geo-spatial techniques and logistic regression were then applied to quantify the impact of travel time on place of delivery (EmOC facility or home), while controlling for confounding socio-cultural and economic factors. Increasing travel time to the nearest EmOC facility is found to act as a strong deterrent to seeking care for the urban poor in Sylhet. Logistic regression results indicate that a 5-min increase in travel time to the nearest EmOC facility is associated with a 30 % decrease (0.655 odds ratio, 95 % CI: 0.529-0.811) in the likelihood of delivery at an EmOC facility rather than at home. Moreover, the impact of travel time varies substantially between public, NGO and private facilities. A 5-min increase in travel time from a private EmOC facility is associated with a 32.9 % decrease in the likelihood of delivering at a private facility, while for public and Non-Government Organizations (NGO) EmOC facilities, the impact is lower (28.2 and 28.6 % decrease respectively). Other strong determinants of delivery at an EmOC facility are the use of antenatal care and mother's formal education, while Muslim mothers are found to be more likely to deliver at home. Geospatial evidence points to the need to strengthen referral and emergency transport systems in order to reduce urban travel time, and establish or relocate EmOC facilities closer to where the poor reside. However, female education and antenatal care coverage remain the most important determinants of facility delivery.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 159 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Kenya 1 <1%
Unknown 158 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 41 26%
Researcher 25 16%
Student > Bachelor 16 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 9%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 7%
Other 23 14%
Unknown 28 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 35 22%
Nursing and Health Professions 23 14%
Social Sciences 21 13%
Engineering 9 6%
Environmental Science 7 4%
Other 26 16%
Unknown 38 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2016.
All research outputs
#9,555,793
of 17,664,715 outputs
Outputs from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1,888
of 3,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#113,874
of 271,926 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,664,715 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,278 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 8.4. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 271,926 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them