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The indirect association of job strain with long-term sickness absence through bullying: a mediation analysis using structural equation modeling

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, August 2016
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3 tweeters

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19 Dimensions

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75 Mendeley
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Title
The indirect association of job strain with long-term sickness absence through bullying: a mediation analysis using structural equation modeling
Published in
BMC Public Health, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12889-016-3522-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Heidi Janssens, Lutgart Braeckman, Bart De Clercq, Annalisa Casini, Dirk De Bacquer, France Kittel, Els Clays

Abstract

In this longitudinal study the complex interplay between both job strain and bullying in relation to sickness absence was investigated. Following the "work environment hypothesis", which establishes several work characteristics as antecedents of bullying, we assumed that job strain, conceptualized by the Job-Demand-Control model, has an indirect relation with long-term sickness absence through bullying. The sample consisted of 2983 Belgian workers, aged 30 to 55 years, who participated in the Belstress III study. They completed a survey, including the Job Content Questionnaire and a bullying inventory, at baseline. Their sickness absence figures were registered during 1 year follow-up. Long-term sickness absence was defined as at least 15 consecutive days. A mediation analysis, using structural equation modeling, was performed to examine the indirect association of job strain through bullying with long-term sickness absence. The full structural model was adjusted for several possible confounders: age, gender, occupational group, educational level, company, smoking habits, alcohol use, body mass index, self-rated health, baseline long-term sickness absence and neuroticism. The results support the hypothesis: a significant indirect association of job strain with long-term sickness absence through bullying was observed, suggesting that bullying is an intermediate variable between job strain and long-term sickness absence. No evidence for the reversed pathway of an indirect association of bullying through job strain was found. Bullying was observed as a mediating variable in the relation between job strain and sickness absence. The results suggest that exposure to job strain may create circumstances in which a worker risks to become a target of bullying. Our findings are generally in line with the work environment hypothesis, which emphasizes the importance of organizational work factors in the origin of bullying. This study highlights that remodeling jobs to reduce job strain may be important in the prevention of bullying and subsequent sickness absence.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 75 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Switzerland 1 1%
Unknown 74 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Researcher 9 12%
Student > Master 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 7 9%
Other 16 21%
Unknown 18 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 13 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 12 16%
Nursing and Health Professions 6 8%
Business, Management and Accounting 5 7%
Social Sciences 5 7%
Other 14 19%
Unknown 20 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 August 2017.
All research outputs
#7,213,422
of 11,580,830 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#5,905
of 7,956 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#144,268
of 259,671 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#291
of 391 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,580,830 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,956 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.2. This one is in the 17th percentile – i.e., 17% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 259,671 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 34th percentile – i.e., 34% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 391 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.