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A phase I clinical study of immunotherapy for advanced colorectal cancers using carcinoembryonic antigen-pulsed dendritic cells mixed with tetanus toxoid and subsequent IL-2 treatment

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
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Title
A phase I clinical study of immunotherapy for advanced colorectal cancers using carcinoembryonic antigen-pulsed dendritic cells mixed with tetanus toxoid and subsequent IL-2 treatment
Published in
Journal of Biomedical Science, January 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12929-016-0279-7
Pubmed ID
Authors

Liu, Ko-Jiunn, Chao, Tsu-Yi, Chang, Jang-Yang, Cheng, Ann-Lii, Ch'ang, Hui-Ju, Kao, Woei-Yau, Wu, Yu-Chen, Yu, Wei-Lan, Chung, Tsai-Rong, Whang-Peng, Jacqueline

Abstract

To better evaluate and improve the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC)-based cancer immunotherapy, we conducted a clinical study of patients with advanced colorectal cancer using carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-pulsed DCs mixed with tetanus toxoid and subsequent interleukin-2 treatment. The tetanus toxoid in the vaccine preparation serves as an adjuvant and provides a non-tumor specific immune response to enhance vaccine efficacy. The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the toxicity of this treatment, (2) observe the clinical responses of vaccinated patients, and (3) investigate the immune responses of patients against CEA before and after treatment. Twelve patients were recruited and treated in this phase I clinical study. These patients all had metastatic colorectal cancer and failed standard chemotherapy. We first subcutaneously immunized patients with metastatic colorectal cancer with 1 × 10(6) CEA-pulsed DCs mixed with tetanus toxoid as an adjuvant. Patients received 3 successive injections with 1 × 10(6) CEA-pulsed DCs alone. Low-dose interleukin-2 was administered subcutaneously following the final DC vaccination to boost the growth of T cells. Patients were evaluated for adverse event and clinical status. Blood samples collected before, during, and after treatment were analyzed for T cell proliferation responses against CEA. No severe treatment-related side effects or toxicity was observed in patients who received the regular 4 DC vaccine injections. Two patients had stable disease and 10 patients showed disease progression. A statistically significant increase in proliferation against CEA by T cells collected after vaccination was observed in 2 of 9 patients. The results of this study indicate that it is feasible and safe to treat colorectal cancer patients using this protocol. An increase in the anti-CEA immune response and a clinical benefit was observed in a small fraction of patients. This treatment protocol should be further evaluated in additional colorectal cancer patients with modifications to enhance T cell responses. ClinicalTrials.gov (identifier NCT00154713 ), September 8, 2005.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 51 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 51 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 18%
Researcher 8 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 7 14%
Student > Master 6 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 6%
Other 9 18%
Unknown 9 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 14 27%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 14%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 12%
Immunology and Microbiology 5 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 6%
Other 6 12%
Unknown 10 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 August 2016.
All research outputs
#4,363,894
of 8,604,226 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Biomedical Science
#195
of 383 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,087
of 255,633 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Biomedical Science
#3
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,604,226 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 46th percentile – i.e., 46% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 383 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 255,633 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 6 of them.