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Attributes of Oct4 in stem cell biology: perspectives on cancer stem cells of the ovary

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Ovarian Research, November 2012
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Title
Attributes of Oct4 in stem cell biology: perspectives on cancer stem cells of the ovary
Published in
Journal of Ovarian Research, November 2012
DOI 10.1186/1757-2215-5-37
Pubmed ID
Authors

Chantel Samardzija, Michael Quinn, Jock K Findlay, Nuzhat Ahmed

Abstract

Epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) remains the most lethal of all the gynaecological malignancies with drug resistance and recurrence remaining the major therapeutic barrier in the management of the disease. Although several studies have been undertaken to understand the mechanisms responsible for chemoresistance and subsequent recurrence in EOC, the exact mechanisms associated with chemoresistance/recurrence continue to remain elusive. Recent studies have shown that the parallel characteristics commonly seen between embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are also shared by a relatively rare population of cells within tumors that display stem cell-like features. These cells, termed 'cancer initiating cells' or 'cancer stem cells (CSCs)' have been shown not only to display increased self renewal and pluripotent abilities as seen in ESCs and iPSCs, but are also highly tumorigenic in in vivo mouse models. Additionally, these CSCs have been implicated in tumor recurrence and chemoresistance, and when isolated have consistently shown to express the master pluripotency and embryonic stem cell regulating gene Oct4. This article reviews the involvement of Oct4 in cancer progression and chemoresistance, with emphasis on ovarian cancer. Overall, we highlight why ovarian cancer patients, who initially respond to conventional chemotherapy subsequently relapse with recurrent chemoresistant disease that is essentially incurable.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 56 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 54 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 21%
Researcher 10 18%
Student > Master 10 18%
Student > Bachelor 5 9%
Student > Postgraduate 4 7%
Other 8 14%
Unknown 7 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 45%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 16%
Medicine and Dentistry 9 16%
Psychology 2 4%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 2%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 8 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 November 2012.
All research outputs
#10,053,369
of 12,567,051 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Ovarian Research
#146
of 239 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#177,604
of 253,064 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Ovarian Research
#17
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,567,051 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 239 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 253,064 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 15th percentile – i.e., 15% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 22nd percentile – i.e., 22% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.