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Within-pair differences of DNA methylation levels between monozygotic twins are different between male and female pairs

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Medical Genomics, August 2016
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Title
Within-pair differences of DNA methylation levels between monozygotic twins are different between male and female pairs
Published in
BMC Medical Genomics, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12920-016-0217-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mikio Watanabe, Chika Honda, Yoshinori Iwatani, Shiro Yorifuji, Hiroyasu Iso, Kei Kamide, Jun Hatazawa, Shinji Kihara, Norio Sakai, Hiroko Watanabe, Kiyoko Makimoto, Mikio Watanabe, Chika Honda, Yoshinori Iwatani

Abstract

DNA methylation levels will be important for detection of epigenetic effects. However, there are few reports showing sex-related differences in the sensitivity to DNA methylation. To evaluate their sex-related individual differences in the sensitivity to methylation rigorously, we performed a systematic analysis of DNA methylation in monozygotic twins, an optimal model to evaluate them because the genetic backgrounds are the same. We examined 30 male and 43 female older monozygotic twin pairs recruited from the registry established by the Center for Twin Research, Osaka University. Their methylation levels were determined using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip Kit (Illumina), which interrogated 485577 highly informative CpG sites at the single-nucleotide resolution, and the median methylation level was calculated for each of the 25657 CpG islands. Within-pair differences of methylation levels (WPDMs) were greater in male pairs than female pairs for 86.0 % of autosomal CpG islands, but were higher in female pairs than male pairs for 76.7 % of X chromosomal CpG islands. Mean WPDMs of CpG islands in each autosomal chromosome were significantly higher in male pairs than in female whereas that in X chromosome was significantly higher in female pairs than in male. Multiple comparison indicated that WPDMs in three autosomal and two X-chromosomal CpG islands were significantly greater in male pairs, whereas those in 22 X-chromosomal CpG islands were significantly greater in female pairs. Sex-related differences were present in the WPDMs of CpG islands in individuals with the same genetic background. These differences may be associated with the sexual influences in susceptibility of some diseases.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 24 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 8%
Japan 1 4%
Unknown 21 88%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 21%
Researcher 5 21%
Professor 4 17%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 13%
Other 3 13%
Unknown 1 4%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 38%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 5 21%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 13%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Environmental Science 1 4%
Other 2 8%
Unknown 3 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 November 2016.
All research outputs
#9,001,293
of 15,357,253 outputs
Outputs from BMC Medical Genomics
#413
of 797 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#129,308
of 265,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Medical Genomics
#12
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,357,253 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 39th percentile – i.e., 39% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 797 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.8. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.