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Working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers: a critical incident analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
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Title
Working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers: a critical incident analysis
Published in
BMC Health Services Research, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12913-016-1694-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Effie Chipeta, Susan Bradley, Wanangwa Chimwaza-Manda, Eilish McAuliffe

Abstract

Malawi continues to experience critical shortages of key health technical cadres that can adequately respond to Malawi's disease burden. Difficult working conditions contribute to low morale and frustration among health care workers. We aimed to understand how obstetric care staff perceive their working relationships with managers. A qualitative exploratory study was conducted in health facilities in Malawi between October and December 2008. Critical Incident Analysis interviews were done in government district hospitals, faith-based health facilities, and a sample of health centres' providing emergency obstetric care. A total of 84 service providers were interviewed. Data were analyzed using NVivo 8 software. Poor leadership styles affected working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers. Main concerns were managers' lack of support for staff welfare and staff performance, lack of mentorship for new staff and junior colleagues, as well as inadequate supportive supervision. All this led to frustrations, diminished motivation, lack of interest in their job and withdrawal from work, including staff seriously considering leaving their post. Positive working relationships between obstetric care staff and their managers are essential for promoting staff motivation and positive work performance. However, this study revealed that staff were demotivated and undermined by transactional leadership styles and behavior, evidenced by management by exception and lack of feedback or recognition. A shift to transformational leadership in nurse-manager relationships is essential to establish good working relationships with staff. Improved providers' job satisfaction and staff retentionare crucial to the provision of high quality care and will also ensure efficiency in health care delivery in Malawi.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 129 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 129 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 28 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 11%
Student > Bachelor 12 9%
Student > Postgraduate 11 9%
Other 23 18%
Unknown 25 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 35 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 19 15%
Social Sciences 14 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 9 7%
Psychology 6 5%
Other 16 12%
Unknown 30 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 August 2016.
All research outputs
#7,178,691
of 8,302,052 outputs
Outputs from BMC Health Services Research
#2,860
of 3,087 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#211,234
of 251,587 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Health Services Research
#204
of 214 outputs
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