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The gut is the epicentre of antibiotic resistance

Overview of attention for article published in Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (88th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
16 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
112 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
267 Mendeley
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Title
The gut is the epicentre of antibiotic resistance
Published in
Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control, January 2012
DOI 10.1186/2047-2994-1-39
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jean Carlet

Abstract

The gut contains very large numbers of bacteria. Changes in the composition of the gut flora, due in particular to antibiotics, can happen silently, leading to the selection of highly resistant bacteria and Candida species. These resistant organisms may remain for months in the gut of the carrier without causing any symptoms or translocate through the gut epithelium, induce healthcare-associated infections, undergo cross-transmission to other individuals, and cause limited outbreaks. Techniques are available to prevent, detect, and treat the carriage of resistant organisms in the gut. However, evidence on these techniques is scant, the only exception being selective digestive decontamination (SDD), which has been extensively studied in neutropenic and ICU patients. After the destruction of resistant colonizing bacteria, which has been successfully obtained in several studies, the gut could be re-colonized with normal faecal flora or probiotics. Studies are warranted to evaluate this concept.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 16 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 267 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 4 1%
United States 2 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Unknown 257 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 52 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 18%
Researcher 35 13%
Student > Bachelor 31 12%
Student > Postgraduate 20 7%
Other 42 16%
Unknown 39 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 61 23%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 46 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 30 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 24 9%
Environmental Science 8 3%
Other 43 16%
Unknown 55 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 23. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 March 2020.
All research outputs
#1,012,663
of 17,356,510 outputs
Outputs from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#126
of 1,012 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#12,819
of 262,898 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Antimicrobial Resistance and Infection Control
#3
of 18 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,356,510 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,012 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 16.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 262,898 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 18 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.