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Cerebral blood perfusion changes in amputees with myoelectric hands after rehabilitation: a SPECT computer-aided analysis

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Neuroscience, August 2016
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Title
Cerebral blood perfusion changes in amputees with myoelectric hands after rehabilitation: a SPECT computer-aided analysis
Published in
BMC Neuroscience, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12868-016-0294-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Qiufang Liu, Xiujuan Zheng, Panli Li, Lian Xu, Longwen He, Zhao Mei, Yinyan Zhu, Gang Huang, Chunlong Zhong, Shaoli Song

Abstract

Rehabilitation, which is essential for amputees with myoelectric hands, can improve the quality of daily life by remodeling the neuron network. In our study, we aim to develop a cerebral blood perfusion (CBF) single-photon emission computed tomography computer-aided (SPECT-CA) detection scheme to automatically locate the brain's activated regions after rehabilitation. Five participants without forearms (three male, two female, mean age 51 ± 12.89 years, two missing the right side, and three missing the left side) were included in our study. In the clinical assessment, all of the participants received higher scores after training. The results of the SPM analysis indicated that CBF in the precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, frontal lobe, temporal lobe and cerebellum was significantly different among the five participants (P < 0.05). Moreover, SPECT-CA showed that the activated brain areas mainly included the precentral gyrus, postcentral gyrus, cerebellum and extensive cerebral cortex. Our study demonstrated that the CBF SPECT-CA method can detect the brain blood perfusion changes induced by rehabilitation with high sensitivity and accuracy. This method has great potential for locating the remodeled neuron regions of amputees with myoelectric hands after rehabilitation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 34 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 34 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 9 26%
Student > Master 4 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 9%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 3 9%
Researcher 3 9%
Other 5 15%
Unknown 7 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 5 15%
Neuroscience 5 15%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 12%
Psychology 3 9%
Engineering 3 9%
Other 4 12%
Unknown 10 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 September 2016.
All research outputs
#8,195,625
of 10,444,782 outputs
Outputs from BMC Neuroscience
#679
of 936 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#181,741
of 257,558 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Neuroscience
#11
of 16 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 10,444,782 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 12th percentile – i.e., 12% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 936 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.7. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 16 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 25th percentile – i.e., 25% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.