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The cancer-associated CTCFL/BORIS protein targets multiple classes of genomic repeats, with a distinct binding and functional preference for humanoid-specific SVA transposable elements

Overview of attention for article published in Epigenetics & Chromatin, August 2016
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  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

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24 tweeters

Citations

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22 Dimensions

Readers on

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87 Mendeley
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Title
The cancer-associated CTCFL/BORIS protein targets multiple classes of genomic repeats, with a distinct binding and functional preference for humanoid-specific SVA transposable elements
Published in
Epigenetics & Chromatin, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s13072-016-0084-2
Pubmed ID
Authors

Elena M. Pugacheva, Evgeny Teplyakov, Qiongfang Wu, Jingjing Li, Cheng Chen, Chengcheng Meng, Jian Liu, Susan Robinson, Dmitry Loukinov, Abdelhalim Boukaba, Andrew Paul Hutchins, Victor Lobanenkov, Alexander Strunnikov

Abstract

A common aberration in cancer is the activation of germline-specific proteins. The DNA-binding proteins among them could generate novel chromatin states, not found in normal cells. The germline-specific transcription factor BORIS/CTCFL, a paralog of chromatin architecture protein CTCF, is often erroneously activated in cancers and rewires the epigenome for the germline-like transcription program. Another common feature of malignancies is the changed expression and epigenetic states of genomic repeats, which could alter the transcription of neighboring genes and cause somatic mutations upon transposition. The role of BORIS in transposable elements and other repeats has never been assessed. The investigation of BORIS and CTCF binding to DNA repeats in the K562 cancer cells dependent on BORIS for self-renewal by ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq revealed three classes of occupancy by these proteins: elements cohabited by BORIS and CTCF, CTCF-only bound, or BORIS-only bound. The CTCF-only enrichment is characteristic for evolutionary old and inactive repeat classes, while BORIS and CTCF co-binding predominately occurs at uncharacterized tandem repeats. These repeats form staggered cluster binding sites, which are a prerequisite for CTCF and BORIS co-binding. At the same time, BORIS preferentially occupies a specific subset of the evolutionary young, transcribed, and mobile genomic repeat family, SVA. Unlike CTCF, BORIS prominently binds to the VNTR region of the SVA repeats in vivo. This suggests a role of BORIS in SVA expression regulation. RNA-seq analysis indicates that BORIS largely serves as a repressor of SVA expression, alongside DNA and histone methylation, with the exception of promoter capture by SVA. Thus, BORIS directly binds to, and regulates SVA repeats, which are essentially movable CpG islands, via clusters of BORIS binding sites. This finding uncovers a new function of the global germline-specific transcriptional regulator BORIS in regulating and repressing the newest class of transposable elements that are actively transposed in human genome when activated. This function of BORIS in cancer cells is likely a reflection of its roles in the germline.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 24 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 87 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 87 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 26 30%
Student > Bachelor 17 20%
Student > Ph. D. Student 14 16%
Researcher 7 8%
Student > Master 7 8%
Other 8 9%
Unknown 8 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 45 52%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 30%
Unspecified 2 2%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 2%
Computer Science 1 1%
Other 2 2%
Unknown 9 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 12. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 October 2020.
All research outputs
#2,254,231
of 19,577,414 outputs
Outputs from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#82
of 521 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#41,380
of 281,573 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Epigenetics & Chromatin
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,577,414 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 88th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 521 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.5. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,573 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them