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Diversity of Clostridium perfringens toxin-genotypes from dairy farms

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, August 2016
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Title
Diversity of Clostridium perfringens toxin-genotypes from dairy farms
Published in
BMC Microbiology, August 2016
DOI 10.1186/s12866-016-0812-6
Pubmed ID
Authors

Svenja Fohler, Guenter Klein, Martina Hoedemaker, Theresa Scheu, Christian Seyboldt, Amely Campe, Katharina Charlotte Jensen, Amir Abdulmawjood

Abstract

Clostridium (C.) perfringens is the causative agent of several diseases in animals and humans, including histotoxic and enteric infections. To gain more insight into the occurrence of its different toxin-genotypes in dairy herds, including those toxin genes previously associated with diseases in cattle or humans, 662 isolates cultivated from feces, rumen content and feed collected from 139 dairy farms were characterized by PCR (detecting cpa, cpb, iap, etx, cpe, and both allelic variants of cpb2). Isolates from feces were assigned to type A (cpa positive, n = 442) and D (cpa and etx positive, n = 2). Those from rumen content (n = 207) and feed (n = 13) were all assigned to type A. The consensus and atypical variants of the cpb2 gene were detected in 64 (14.5 %) and 138 (31.22 %) of all isolates from feces, and 30 (14.5 %) and 54 (26.1 %) of all isolates from rumen content, respectively. Both allelic variants of cpb2 occurred frequently in animals without signs of acute enteric disease, whereby the atypical variant dominated. Five (0.8 %) of all type A isolates were positive for the cpe gene. Therefore, the present study indicates that dairy cows are no primary source for potentially human pathogenic enterotoxin gene positive strains.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 28 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 18%
Student > Master 4 14%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 11%
Researcher 3 11%
Professor 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 8 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 25%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 5 18%
Immunology and Microbiology 3 11%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Economics, Econometrics and Finance 1 4%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 10 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 June 2017.
All research outputs
#20,338,537
of 22,884,315 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#2,694
of 3,195 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#293,961
of 336,882 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#66
of 84 outputs
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