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Toward epigenetic and gene regulation models of specific language impairment: looking for links among growth, genes, and impairments

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, November 2012
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source
twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
51 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
104 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Toward epigenetic and gene regulation models of specific language impairment: looking for links among growth, genes, and impairments
Published in
Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders, November 2012
DOI 10.1186/1866-1955-4-27
Pubmed ID
Authors

Mabel L Rice

Abstract

Children with specific language impairment (SLI) are thought to have an inherited form of language impairment that spares other developmental domains. SLI shows strong heritability and recent linkage and association studies have replicated results for candidate genes. Regulatory regions of the genes may be involved. Behavioral growth models of language development of children with SLI reveal that the onset of language is delayed, and the growth trajectories of children with SLI parallel those of younger children without SLI. The rate of language acquisition decelerates in the pre-adolescent period, resulting in immature language levels for the children with SLI that persist into adolescence and beyond. Recent genetic and epigenetic discoveries and models relevant to language impairment are reviewed. T cell regulation of onset, acceleration, and deceleration signaling are described as potential conceptual parallels to the growth timing elements of language acquisition and impairment. A growth signaling disruption (GSD) hypothesis is proposed for SLI, which posits that faulty timing mechanisms at the cellular level, intrinsic to neurocortical functioning essential for language onset and growth regulation, are at the core of the growth outcomes of SLI. The GSD highlights the need to document and account for growth patterns over childhood and suggests needed directions for future investigation.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 104 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 2%
Germany 1 <1%
France 1 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 97 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 28 27%
Researcher 20 19%
Student > Master 13 13%
Student > Bachelor 13 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 7 7%
Other 18 17%
Unknown 5 5%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 34 33%
Neuroscience 13 13%
Social Sciences 10 10%
Linguistics 10 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 10 10%
Other 17 16%
Unknown 10 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2016.
All research outputs
#5,953,362
of 21,339,655 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#227
of 449 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#72,150
of 290,369 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Neurodevelopmental Disorders
#14
of 22 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 21,339,655 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 449 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.4. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 290,369 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 22 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.