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The Human Sweet Tooth

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Oral Health, July 2006
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#29 of 1,173)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
2 blogs
twitter
2 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
57 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
89 Mendeley
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Title
The Human Sweet Tooth
Published in
BMC Oral Health, July 2006
DOI 10.1186/1472-6831-6-s1-s17
Pubmed ID
Authors

Danielle R Reed, Amanda H McDaniel

Abstract

Humans love the taste of sugar and the word "sweet" is used to describe not only this basic taste quality but also something that is desirable or pleasurable, e.g., la dolce vita. Although sugar or sweetened foods are generally among the most preferred choices, not everyone likes sugar, especially at high concentrations. The focus of my group's research is to understand why some people have a sweet tooth and others do not. We have used genetic and molecular techniques in humans, rats, mice, cats and primates to understand the origins of sweet taste perception. Our studies demonstrate that there are two sweet receptor genes (TAS1R2 and TAS1R3), and alleles of one of the two genes predict the avidity with which some mammals drink sweet solutions. We also find a relationship between sweet and bitter perception. Children who are genetically more sensitive to bitter compounds report that very sweet solutions are more pleasant and they prefer sweet carbonated beverages more than milk, relative to less bitter-sensitive peers. Overall, people differ in their ability to perceive the basic tastes, and particular constellations of genes and experience may drive some people, but not others, toward a caries-inducing sweet diet. Future studies will be designed to understand how a genetic preference for sweet food and drink might contribute to the development of dental caries.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 89 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 1 1%
Unknown 88 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 15 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 17%
Student > Master 13 15%
Researcher 11 12%
Other 7 8%
Other 17 19%
Unknown 11 12%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 15 17%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 13 15%
Psychology 13 15%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 6%
Nursing and Health Professions 4 4%
Other 20 22%
Unknown 19 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 27. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 May 2019.
All research outputs
#1,019,572
of 19,557,897 outputs
Outputs from BMC Oral Health
#29
of 1,173 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,659
of 277,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Oral Health
#1
of 42 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,557,897 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,173 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 277,256 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 42 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.