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Microbial taxa in dust and excreta associated with the productive performance of commercial meat chicken flocks

Overview of attention for article published in Animal Microbiome, October 2021
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4 tweeters

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Title
Microbial taxa in dust and excreta associated with the productive performance of commercial meat chicken flocks
Published in
Animal Microbiome, October 2021
DOI 10.1186/s42523-021-00127-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Yugal Raj Bindari, Robert J. Moore, Thi Thu Hao Van, Stephen W. Walkden-Brown, Priscilla F. Gerber

Abstract

A major focus of research on the gut microbiota of poultry has been to define signatures of a healthy gut and identify microbiota components that correlate with feed conversion. However, there is a high variation in individual gut microbiota profiles and their association with performance. Population level samples such as dust and pooled excreta could be useful to investigate bacterial signatures associated with productivity at the flock-level. This study was designed to investigate the bacterial signatures of high and low-performing commercial meat chicken farms in dust and pooled excreta samples. Poultry house dust and fresh pooled excreta were collected at days 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 of age from 8 farms of two Australian integrator companies and 389 samples assessed by 16S ribosomal RNA gene amplicon sequencing. The farms were ranked as low (n = 4) or high performers (n = 4) based on feed conversion rate corrected by body weight. Permutational analysis of variance based on Bray-Curtis dissimilarities using abundance data for bacterial community structure results showed that company explained the highest variation in the bacterial community structure in excreta (R2 = 0.21, p = 0.001) while age explained the highest variation in the bacterial community structure in dust (R2 = 0.13, p = 0.001). Farm performance explained the least variation in the bacterial community structure in both dust (R2 = 0.03, p = 0.001) and excreta (R2 = 0.01, p = 0.001) samples. However, specific bacterial taxa were found to be associated with high and low performance in both dust and excreta. The bacteria taxa associated with high-performing farms in dust or excreta found in this study were Enterococcus and Candidatus Arthromitus whereas bacterial taxa associated with low-performing farms included Nocardia, Lapillococcus, Brachybacterium, Ruania, Dietzia, Brevibacterium, Jeotgalicoccus, Corynebacterium and Aerococcus. Dust and excreta could be useful for investigating bacterial signatures associated with high and low performance in commercial poultry farms. Further studies on a larger number of farms are needed to determine if the bacterial signatures found in this study are reproducible.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 3 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Professor 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 44%
Environmental Science 1 11%
Computer Science 1 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 11%
Unknown 2 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 04 October 2021.
All research outputs
#13,835,751
of 22,172,124 outputs
Outputs from Animal Microbiome
#166
of 203 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,233
of 351,477 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Animal Microbiome
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,172,124 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 203 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 14.8. This one is in the 14th percentile – i.e., 14% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 351,477 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them